Day: June 14, 2020

Consumers ‘should shop with confidence’, says PM

“People should shop, and shop with confidence” when non-essential stores reopen in England on Monday, Prime Minister Boris Johnson has said.

Mr Johnson said retail staff were “excited” and had done “a huge amount of work” to allow for safer shopping.

But he said people must continue to respect social distancing measures.

It comes as a further 36 deaths from coronavirus were announced in the past 24 hours. It brings the UK death toll – across all settings – to 41,698.

The latest daily figure is the lowest since before lockdown began on 23 March, but there tends to be fewer deaths reported at the weekend, because of a reporting lag.

While food shops and pharmacies, as well as other essential retailers including banks and petrol stations, have been open throughout lockdown, non-essential stores, such as book shops and fashion outlets, have been shuttered since 23 March.

The prime minister

Read More

Banning bushmeat could make it harder to stop future pandemics

Since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, eating the meat of wild animals has been getting a bad press.

Last month, more than 300 conservation groups signed an open letter asking the World Health Organization (WHO) to take measures to prevent new diseases emerging from wild animals. This included banning the sale of wild animal meat, also known as bushmeat. The request stemmed from evidence that SARS-CoV-2 likely originated in a wild animal, probably a species of bat, before jumping to an intermediate host, possibly a pangolin, and then infecting a human.

Although exactly where the first person picked up the virus is hotly contested, the media and researchers have focused on China’s wet markets, particularly those selling wild animals and their meat. At these markets, finding civet cats, turtles, bats and pangolins kept alive in small cages, often in close proximity, is not uncommon. In such conditions, wild animals

Read More

A Sammy Sosa and Mark McGwire timeline

It made sense that Mark McGwire and Sammy Sosa’s lives would never be the same after toppling Major League Baseball’s famous single-season home-run record in 1998. But instead of becoming icons, they became two of the polarizing faces of baseball’s steroid era.

They were on top of the world for a short time, but what quickly followed for each was public turmoil, scandal, steroid accusations and one confession. Gone was the magic of the summer of ‘98 and what it took it place was one of MLB’s long-lasting shames — how fans couldn’t believe what they were seeing with their own eyes.

Sosa has still never admitted he used performance-enhancing drugs. That’s part of the reason his relationship with the Cubs has soured. McGwire eventually admitted he used PEDs, and was brought back into MLB as a coach. But neither slugger gets the ambassador treatment from MLB or their former

Read More

How much coronavirus risk is there in common travel activities? We asked an expert

Travel in the middle of a global pandemic presents challenges, with each activity carrying its own level of risk for coronavirus.

Joseph Khabbaza, a pulmonary and critical care physician at the Cleveland Clinic, said some of the biggest questions he’s getting relate to travel activities. 

Khabbaza, who treats coronavirus patients, said the primary path of transmission is contacts with respiratory droplets produced by infected people. Face masks, physical distancing, frequent handwashing and cleaning and disinfecting of surfaces have become standard across the travel sector.  

“Every industry has interventions in place to make things safer,” he said.

The Cleveland Clinic has been helping United Airlines develop its coronavirus mitigation policies, including mandatory face masks, touchless kiosks and physical distancing.

“Companies are bringing in outside health experts,” Khabbaza said. “That can be a little bit reassuring.”

Khabbaza, who’s taking a 500-mile road trip with his family to Long Island, New York, offered

Read More

Public health experts ranked 36 American activities based on risk

As more and more states begin phases of reopening, many Americans are now wondering what is safe to do and what should still be avoided to prevent the spread of coronavirus.

“There’s a huge amount of variation from business to business, from area to area, in how much transmission risk there is for resuming economic activity,” Dr. Katherine Baicker, of the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy, told Yahoo Finance’s The Ticker.

An analysis by MLive chose 36 American activities and asked four public health experts in Michigan to evaluate the risk of coronavirus exposure for each one. The doctors factored in whether the activity is inside or outside, proximity to others, length of potential exposure, likelihood of compliance, and personal risk level. 

Bars and large music concerts are the riskiest settings right now. (Graphic: David Foster/Yahoo Finance)

The experts gave a score to each activity, with

Read More

A Home Exercise Plan That Really Works

Even regular exercisers can see their workout routines veer off-course when unexpected changes occur. That’s what happened this past spring when millions of Americans were under stay-at-home orders due to the corona­virus pandemic.

Fitness centers closed, and walking outdoors was more difficult because of concerns about being around too many people.

But it’s still important to stay active. “The older you are, the more quickly you lose physical fitness,” says LaVona Traywick, Ph.D., an assistant professor in the department of occupational therapy at the University of Central Arkansas. “Deconditioning can start in as little as one week.”

In addition to the many proven health benefits of working out, exercise can help your immune system work better, too.

Though it might take time to get used to working out in your living room, shifting to an at-home exercise routine isn’t difficult. Online classes and connected exercise equipment, such as stationary bikes

Read More

Reopening California schools is dangerous. But so is letting kids go a year without learning

Sean Brandlin, an eighth grade social studies teacher at El Segundo Middle School, stands in his classroom. <span class="copyright">(Los Angeles Times)</span>
Sean Brandlin, an eighth grade social studies teacher at El Segundo Middle School, stands in his classroom. (Los Angeles Times)

With COVID-19 cases at very low levels within its borders, Israel fully reopened its schools in mid-May. By the end of the month, 130 students at a Jerusalem high school had tested positive for the virus, setting off a flurry of quarantines for people who’d had physical contact with the students and the closure of dozens of schools.

This is the kind of outcome American parents dread as they contemplate sending their children back to school sometime this summer or fall.

It’s a troubling scenario, but so is the remote-learning experience of the past three months. The reality is, more kids will do better if schools reopen than if they continue online-only classes. But regardless of how we proceed, we must do better.

With little direction or help from federal

Read More

This wheelchair user with cerebral palsy just qualified as a gym instructor and says there are no barriers to fitness

Jay Moir is a fitness instructor with cerebral palsy.
Jay Moir is a fitness instructor with cerebral palsy.

Jay Moir

  • Jay Moir is a 20-year-old fitness instructor based in Aberdeen, Scotland.

  • He is also a wheelchair user with cerebral palsy, but won’t let that be a barrier to achieving his goals.

  • Moir struggled with his mental health as a teenager, dropping out of school and gaining weight, but said fitness “gave him his life back,” and he also lost 70 pounds.

  • He trains six days a week and told Insider that able-bodied people in the gym often underestimate his strength.

  • “In the gym, I feel strong and powerful but most importantly, happy!” he said.

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

The fitness industry can be very intimidating.

Whether it’s the weights room of a gym, a trendy spin studio, or even a Zoom workout class, many workout environments can put people off, which stops them from getting active.

One

Read More

What to Do if Your Medical School Is Online This Fall Due to Coronavirus

The coronavirus pandemic is a public health crisis that highlights the importance of the medical profession. During a time such as this one, when a contagious disease has spread across the world and humanity is collectively searching for a vaccine or cure, future physicians may feel a sense of urgency and want to begin training immediately.

However, the fight against the coronavirus relies upon social distancing measures, posing a challenge to newly admitted medical students. The upcoming fall semester for first-year medical students might differ from what it would have been if the virus outbreak had not emerged, since some or all coursework may need to be completed virtually, according to medical education experts. For instance, this May, Harvard Medical School announced that its fall 2020 classes for first-year medical students would “commence remotely.”

[Read: What the Coronavirus Pandemic Means for Premed Students.]

Nevertheless, many experts say that so

Read More

Ontario expands ‘social bubble’ to 10 people, PM mandates airport temperature checks

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

Alberta’s chief medical officer of health, Dr. Deena Hinshaw, revealed about 60 per cent of active COVID-19 cases in the province are in people under the age of 40. Recently, there has been a particular increase in cases in individuals between the ages of 20 and 29.

“It is important for younger Albertans to remember that while you may not be at risk for severe outcomes of infection, your actions are critical to protecting those around you,” Dr. Hinshaw said.

There has also been a significant rise in COVID-19 cases in Edmonton, increasing from 58 to 149 in the last … Read More