Day: June 15, 2020

Why Parents Shouldn’t Be Too Worried If Their Teen Can’t Put Their Phone Down Right Now

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You don’t have to be a social psychologist to notice that daily life has been altered pretty drastically for people of all ages bringing many of us even closer with our devices. But for tech-obsessed teenagers, whose non-tech activities — school days, sports, and social outings — have been largely taken away, the result has been even more screen time. (That’s on top of the seven hours a day teens tend to spend on screens, to begin with).

“This pandemic has definitely challenged normal adolescent development, which is centered on having experiences that develop your identity separate from your family’s and adolescent peer socialization,” says Hina J. Talib, M.D., program director of the post-doctoral fellowship in adolescent medicine at Children’s Hospital at Montefiore.

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And while today’s tech (think: Zoom, TikTok, Instagram, online classes) does provide social connection, if you’re

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Americans Want To Shop Small, Here’s How To Make Them Customers

With the prominence of things like Small Business Saturday during the holiday shopping season and the slow food movement attracting customers to local restaurants that also source local ingredients, consumers have grown increasingly aware of the benefits of patronizing businesses in their community.

Now a recently released survey commissioned by Groupon, Inc. (NASDAQ: GRPN) and conducted by market research company OnePoll reveals that the global COVID-19 pandemic has heightened that awareness to a new high.

Pent-up Demand

The survey, which was conducted over the first five days of May among 2,000 Americans, showed that 75% of respondents plan to increase their support of local businesses as quarantine lockdown measures are cautiously lifted.

The survey found that the pandemic compelled consumers to confront the tenuous position most U.S. businesses found themselves in as they shut down in the interest of public safety. Not only this, but consumers were also forced to

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Common problems and how to fix them

There’s nothing better than pulling a PlayStation VR headset from its packaging, putting it on your head for the first time, and diving into the wonderful worlds that only virtual reality can deliver. Virtual reality is intense, surreal, and unlike anything we’ve seen in video games before.

At the same time, there’s nothing worse than plugging in your PSVR for the first time, only to discover that it isn’t working the way it’s supposed to. To help you iron out the kinks, we’ve compiled a list of some of the most common problems plaguing Sony’s newfangled headset, as well as the steps you can take to rectify them. Not all of these will affect every user — particularly those pertaining to motion sickness — and not every solution we put forth is guaranteed to fix your problem. For more serious issues, you’ll likely have to contact Sony directly.

Further reading:

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Wildfire Smoke And Coronavirus Combine Arizona Health Risks

TUCSON, AZ — As several infernos burn across Arizona, the U.S. Forest Service is warning that the combined health risks of wildfire smoke and coronavirus shouldn’t go ignored. In a document released earlier this month, the agency said that the viral outbreak”complicates public health response to wildfire smoke.”

“People who are either susceptible to or affected by COVID-19 may have health conditions that also make them vulnerable to wildfire smoke exposure,” the document notes, though it also warns that this same dynamic is at play in the spread of coronavirus.

“Exposure to air pollutants in wildfire smoke can irritate the lungs, cause inflammation, alter immune function, and increase susceptibility to respiratory infections, likely including COVID-19,” the Forest Service advised, citing a recent study of coronavirus-related deaths in Northern Italy. (That study’s authors concluded that “the high level of pollution in Northern Italy should be considered an additional co-factor of the

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2020 MassChallenge Texas In Austin Details Released

AUSTIN, TX — MassChallenge, a global network of zero-equity startup accelerators, has announced the 58 early-stage startups invited to join the 2020 MassChallenge Texas in Austin program.

The selected startups have been rigorously vetted by a community of more than 500 expert judges and represent the top 10 percent of applications from around the world, officials said in an advisory.

“Today’s entrepreneurs will have a fundamental impact on how efficiently the world recovers from the current economic crisis, and the game-changing startups in this year’s Austin-based cohort are poised to do just that,” Mike Millard, managing director of MassChallenge Texas, said. “I am incredibly impressed by the founders’ abilities to navigate their businesses through the coronavirus crisis, leveraging the intersection of business and technology to create solutions across agriculture, internet of things, medical devices, manufacturing, and more. These startups have a place helping large organizations recalibrate as they adapt to

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Shop these black-owned fitness brands

Superior and stylish exercise apparel brings out the inner champion for any fitness enthusiast. Not to mention, there’s nothing like original designs and cultural prints that make you stand out from a crowd donning the same pair of navy leggings. Not available in big-name stores, these black-owned fitness brands have made a name for themselves by providing seasonal looks that accompany a poignant message.

Whether that be inclusivity size-wise or prints native to their roots, adding these pieces to your closet is a great way to support artists of color while turning heads at the same time. Scroll on to discover some of the best up-and-coming labels catering to diverse audiences and snag something for your next hiking trip to bike ride before sizes sell out.

An African-inspired athleisure brand, Sankofa Athletics make all their products in the United States and feature both men’s and women’s styles.

Drawing her inspiration

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Biden is far less unpopular than Hillary Clinton was four years ago, polling shows

WASHINGTON — One of the biggest differences in the presidential polling between 2016 and now is that Joe Biden’s negative numbers aren’t close to where Hillary Clinton’s were at this exact same point in the race.

In the June 2016 NBC News/Wall Street Journal poll — so after clinching the Democratic nomination but before the party’s convention — Clinton’s favorable/unfavorable rating was 33 percent positive, 55 percent negative (-22).

And Trump’s was worse: 29 percent positive, 60 percent negative (-31).

But compare those numbers with the fav/unfav results from our recent June 2020 NBC News/WSJ poll.

Here’s Biden among registered voters: 37 percent positive, 38 percent negative (-1).

And here’s Trump: 40 percent positive, 51 percent negative (-11).

Now Republicans still have the opportunity to define Biden — 23 percent of voters have a neutral opinion of him (compared to 8 percent for Trump now and 12 percent for Clinton

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we answer 6 common face mask problems

Face coverings are now mandatory on public transport in England, to slow the spread of coronavirus as things start to come back to normal. But wearing a face mask presents a couple of annoying problems: taking a sip of water on a hot train is tricky, as is keeping your make-up neat underneath. Read on below for some answers.

How to stop your glasses steaming up

Wearing a mask can cover more than your nose and mouth: water vapour from your breath can get funnelled upwards and cloud your glasses, making it difficult to see. 

Alisdair Buchanan, the owner of Buchanan Optometrists in Snodland, Kent, has a couple of tips to stop this happening. The first is to stop your glasses from coming into contact with moisture in the first place, by sealing the top of the mask to your face with micropore tape.

Placing your glasses on top of

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Are we all OCD now, with obsessive hand-washing and technology addiction?

<span class="caption">What once looked like obsessive-compulsive disorder has become normal when faced with a deadly pandemic. </span> <span class="attribution"><a class="link rapid-noclick-resp" href="https://www.gettyimages.com/detail/photo/double-exposure-portrait-of-face-of-young-man-royalty-free-image/1219500833" rel="nofollow noopener" target="_blank" data-ylk="slk:Busà Photography via Getty Images">Busà Photography via Getty Images</a></span>
What once looked like obsessive-compulsive disorder has become normal when faced with a deadly pandemic. Busà Photography via Getty Images

One of the hallmarks of obsessive-compulsive disorder is contamination fears and excessive hand-washing. Years ago, a patient with severe OCD came to my office wearing gloves and a mask and refused to sit on any of the “contaminated” chairs. Now, these same behaviors are accepted and even encouraged to keep everyone healthy.

This new normal in the face of a deadly pandemic has permeated our culture and will continue to influence it. Many stores now prominently post rules mandating face masks and hand sanitizer use and limit the number of customers allowed inside at one time. Walkers and joggers politely cross the street to avoid proximity to each other.

Only a few months ago, this type of behavior would have been considered excessive, irrational, even pathological, and certainly not healthy.

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The Greatest And Funniest Memes Of This Cursed Year, 2020

Even more than most other years, 2020 has been a time when we’ve experienced events through meme culture. Having spent almost half of the year to this point either indoors or worrying about whether we should be indoors, the glut of despairing jokes, coronavirus memes and Dominic Cummings tweetstorms have been incredibly comforting, even when they’ve been pressing on some miserable and infuriating moments.

The strange warping and flexing flow of time since about mid-March generally gets put down to lockdown, the stress of living through a pandemic and the overriding sense that we’ve been monkey-barring our way from one day to the next. But perhaps the realisation that, say, Olly Murs’s horrendous prank with the Pringles tube only happened in the middle of May, is jarring for reasons other than the fact that you’ve not been to the pub in three months.

We’ve been living more intensely online, and

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