Month: July 2020

How University of California campuses are opening this fall

University of California campuses will offer mostly online instruction this fall, but each school has the power to set its own rules and at least two of them are already revising early plans to account for new coronavirus outbreaks.

Some schools plan to offer 30% of instruction in person, while others intend to limit on-site coursework to laboratory and studio classes. Some are prioritizing incoming freshmen for campus housing while others plan to reserve rooms for students with special circumstances, including financial need.

As the pandemic’s trajectory continues to change, university administrators warn campuses may revert to reduced operations even after the fall semester begins.

At least two schools — UC Berkeley and UC Merced — are already reevaluating their plans in light of recent COVID-19 developments. At Cal, that’s because frat parties triggered an outbreak that more than doubled the total number of infections tied to Berkeley’s campus, officials

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University professors fear returning to campus as coronavirus cases surge

Laura Crary, an art history professor at a liberal arts college in South Carolina, is anxious to return to the classroom, so much so that she was prescribed anti-anxiety medications for the first time in her life.

“I am 62.5 years old, which means I’m four years from full retirement age, or I’d probably retire right now because I’m very nervous,” she said.

While the final fall 2020 plans at her college are still pending, professors at her university were told that conducting solely online classes was not an option. Crary asked that NBC News not name the college.

As coronavirus cases start to surge in more than 30 states across the U.S., some professors are pushing back when it comes to returning to campus for in-person teaching. More than 50% of colleges and universities have announced they will be hosting professors or students back on campus in the next

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Candace Cameron Bure’s Trainer Will Inspire You to Move Your Body ASAP

“You get a little spoiled when you have a trainer.”

Understatement of 2020 when it comes to working out, right? That’s what Kira Stokes, the celebrity trainer who works with celebrity clients such as Candace Cameron Bure, Shay Mitchell and Ashley Graham told us when it comes to working out at home since the Coronavirus pandemic hit. 

Fortunately, many celebrity trainers have pivoted to online workouts, including Stokes, who has her own fitness app that offers a free 7-day trial. 

Stokes has been honing her unique method for decades, focusing on the mind and body connection and emphasizing transitions between movements.

“I’m very proud of being 45. It’s a testament to the method to be able to remain healthy and strong,” Stokes told E!. “I really started training clients when I was a sophomore at Boston College. Knowing at that time too that it was my calling, that

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More Residents Refusing To Participate In Contact Tracing

HILLSBOROUGH COUNTY, FL — While Hillsborough County’s positive test rates for coronavirus continue to soar, health officials say their ability to trace the coronavirus has declined, placing the county at a major disadvantage in combating the spread of the virus.

That was the word from Dr. Douglas Holt, director of the Florida Department of Health in Hillsborough County, speaking to members of the Hillsborough County Emergency Policy Group Thursday.

Joined by Dr. Marissa Levine of the University of South Florida College of Public Health, Holt told EPG members that contract tracing provides crucial information in identifying community patterns and hot spots, and the county just isn’t getting the cooperation it needs from residents.

According to an updated model by PolicyLab at Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia, Florida has the potential to be the next epicenter of the coronavirus pandemic in the United States, with Tampa Bay specifically called out.

“We are

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Trump’s campaign to open schools provokes mounting backlash even from GOP

President Donald Trump has been on a rampage against public schools and colleges all week, threatening to use the power of the federal government to strong-arm officials into reopening classrooms.

But his effort is now creating a backlash: An overwhelming alignment of state and even Republican-aligned organizations oppose the rush to reopen schools. The nation’s leading pediatricians, Republican state school chiefs, Christian colleges and even the U.S. Chamber of Commerce have all challenged parts of Trump’s pressure campaign.

“Threats are not helpful,” Joy Hofmeister, the Republican state superintendent of public instruction in Oklahoma, told POLITICO on Friday. “We do not need to be schooled on why it’s important to reopen.”

Both Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos have issued federal funding threats to schools that don’t fully reopen. On Friday, Trump went a step further in blasting online learning — which many school districts and colleges are planning to use

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Trump campaign to open schools provokes mounting backlash even from GOP

President Donald Trump has been on a rampage against public schools and colleges all week, threatening to use the power of the federal government to strong-arm officials into reopening classrooms.

But his effort is now creating a backlash: An overwhelming alignment of state and even Republican-aligned organizations oppose the rush to reopen schools. The nation’s leading pediatricians, Republican state school chiefs, Christian colleges and even the U.S. Chamber of Commerce have all challenged parts of Trump’s pressure campaign.

“Threats are not helpful,” Joy Hofmeister, the Republican state superintendent of public instruction in Oklahoma, told POLITICO on Friday. “We do not need to be schooled on why it’s important to reopen.”

Both Trump and Education Secretary Betsy DeVos have issued federal funding threats to schools that don’t fully reopen. On Friday, Trump went a step further in blasting online learning — which many school districts and colleges are planning to use

Read More

When will school open? Here’s a state-by-state list

When will schools open back up? How will schools open back up? Is there going to be school this year?

These are the questions on every parent’s mind these days. TODAY Parents has collected the latest information from every state and the largest school districts in every state. While some schools are planning to start the new school year with in-person instruction, many others are offering online options or a hybrid model. Please note: We’ll keep updating this story, but the situation is changing rapidly, so please check with your local school district for the latest.

Need help deciding what to do about school this year? See our story with expert advice on how to make the decision.

In the meantime, here’s what we know about schools re-opening this year:

Alabama

On June 26, State Superintendent Eric Mackey announced that all Alabama public schools should reopen on time. However, districts

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They might as well have put up barbed wire round the GP’s surgery

An app on a doctor's phone that remotely reads a stethoscope - Paul Grover for the Telegraph
An app on a doctor’s phone that remotely reads a stethoscope – Paul Grover for the Telegraph

SIR – I was reading the letter by Professor Martin Marshall, the chairman of the Royal College of General Practitioners, regarding the role of GPs during the pandemic, until I reached his remark: “It has been business as usual in general practice throughout the pandemic.” I nearly fell off my chair.

Short of putting up a barbed-wire fence round our local GP surgery, they have done just about everything else to dissuade patients from contacting them.

I have been bombarded with SMS messages, telling me what they weren’t prepared to do, which for most of the time was just about everything.

“Stay away,” was the clear message coming out, even if the surgery was actually open at times.

How can supermarket employees on a minimum wage continue to serve us, face to face,

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We’re Facing a Mental Health Crisis in Healthcare Workers, the Majority of Whom Are Women

Midsection of female doctor helping surgeon wearing surgical glove. Medical colleagues are preparing for surgery. They are standing in emergency room.
Midsection of female doctor helping surgeon wearing surgical glove. Medical colleagues are preparing for surgery. They are standing in emergency room.

More than 130,000 Americans have died from COVID-19, a novel strain of coronavirus, and cases continue to surge in communities across the country. But for frontline medical workers, particularly those working in emergency rooms and treating COVID-19 patients, the fight has only just begun.

While the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimates that at least 515 healthcare workers have died so far after contracting COVID-19 – with 34 percent of cases still unreported – a larger, potentially even more deadly crisis is looming. For doctors, nurses, hospital cleaners, and other staff members on the front lines – nearly 80 percent of whom are women, according to the US Bureau of Labor and Statistics – it’s their mental health that has been devastated, and this country is beyond

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After an online offseason, Bears face a new batch of complications as they prepare for training camp

CHICAGO — When Chicago Bears defensive coordinator Chuck Pagano packed up his office at Halas Hall in March, he had no idea he would spend the next four months figuring out how to run a defense from his computer at home.

Like most of the rest of the world, the coronavirus pandemic forced Bears coaches to adapt to an online environment, connecting with and teaching their players from afar. Pagano will return to team facilities in late July with a new set of digital capabilities.

“From a tech standpoint, I’m off the charts for a guy that’s going to be 60 in October,” Pagano said. “I feel like I’m way more tech savvy than I’ve ever been.”

Now, as Matt Nagy, Pagano and the rest of the Bears coaches prepare for a training camp unlike any they’ve held before, adaptability still will be key.

A whole new batch of complications

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