frank lampard

Australia deals with virus spike; Serbia erupts in violence

BELGRADE, Serbia (AP) — The reimposition of coronavirus lockdown measures in Serbia touched off violent clashes in the capital Belgrade that left at least 60 police and protesters hurt amid renewed warnings that the virus is still gathering pace.

Australia grappled with a COVID-19 spike in the city of Melbourne that prepared on Wednesday for a second lockdown to contain the virus’ spread. Melbourne’s virus woes contrasted sharply with other areas of the country that have been reporting low or no daily infections.

Africa surpassed the half million mark of coronavirus infections according to figures released Wednesday by the Africa Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. South Africa reported another day of more than 10,000 confirmed cases.

There’s no way to know the real number of confirmed virus cases among Africa’s 1.3 billion people as its 54 countries continue to face a serious shortage of testing materials for the virus.

Read More

Back-to-School Shopping Will Experience New Shifts in Consumer Behavior Amid Uncertainty

Click here to read the full article.

According to data from Deloitte consumers plan to spend $10.4 billion online this back-to-school season, up from $8.1 billion in 2019.

For many families, b-t-s shopping is an annual ritual to stock up on backpacks, school supplies and new clothes for the school year. But in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic research from Deloitte suggests this year’s shopping will look a bit different. After 12 years of observing the b-t-s season, Deloitte noted in its 2020 b-t-s report that nothing has caused disruption to families, schools, and retailers like COVID-19.

While b-t-s typically marks a time of transition, this year is lingering in a time of uncertainty. For back-to-college shoppers, this uncertainty is influencing overall consumer behavior. In its survey, Deloitte found 62 percent of parents are anxious about sending kids back to college as coronavirus continues to linger. In fact, concerns

Read More

How to Make Natural Dyes From Things You Already Have Around Your House

From avocado pits to turmeric powder.

Ocean Rose with yarn she dyed.
Ocean Rose with yarn she dyed.

We were a couple months into quarantine when my best friend announced to me that they had started dyeing their clothes with things they found around their kitchen. 

First there was a cropped knit dyed a brilliant yellow by turmeric root, then a button-up turned pink with the help of some beets. When we met up in a park to wave hello at our first socially-distant hangout, they picked a few small fistfuls of green grass to take home and experiment with, too. 

While the grass dye didn’t have quite the effect intended (it turned a white T-shirt “the faintest faintest brown,” they later told me), their interest in it helped me to start seeing all kinds of plants around me — from my kitchen waste to the flower petals strewn on the ground in the nearby cemetery

Read More

Walgreens to open 500 to 700 in-store clinics with primary care doctors in deal with VillageMD

The doctor will see you now … at Walgreens.

Walgreens plans to staff 500 to 700 of its stores with primary care doctors in the next five years in a partnership with medical services provider VillageMD.

The company, which has nearly 9,300 locations in the U.S., announced the plan Wednesday morning, saying it would also invest in VillageMD.

It will open the primary care clinics under the brand Village Medical at Walgreens. The clinics will be spread out among more than 30 markets, with more than half located in locations that are underserved by medical professionals.

The move marks the latest evolution in the drug store sector’s pivot away from retail floor space toward more healthcare services.

Walgreens’ archrival, CVS, has invested in its own in-store clinical services brand called MinuteClinic, which is offered at about 1,100 locations. CVS is also opening up to 1,500 HealthHUB locations that will include

Read More

4 Ways You Were Conditioned To Hate Fitness As A Kid

Years of viewing fitness as punishment can take some time to repair. (Photo: Getty Images/HuffPost)
Years of viewing fitness as punishment can take some time to repair. (Photo: Getty Images/HuffPost)

Experiences we have when we’re young are incredibly formative ― especially when it comes to something like exercise.

Fitness isn’t just physical; it also has a major effect on the mind. If you have a positive outlook on it (or even just a tolerable one), the likelihood is pretty good that exercise will improve your mental health. But if you’ve had negative emotions about working out in the past, chances are that moving your body can cause more stress than you may even think is worth it.

Part of that stems from how you may have thought about exercise when you were young. There are a handful of subtle ways we can be conditioned to hate fitness as kids. Below are just a few of them:

Mandated School Fitness Tests And Curriculum

Requiring students to

Read More

COVID Fear Is Keeping Chronically Ill People From Getting Medical Care

The novel coronavirus pandemic is keeping Americans away from the doctor’s office. For most people, that means little more than postponing a dental checkup or enduring a minor illness at home. 

But those with chronic medical conditions ― especially ailments that make them more susceptible to infections like COVID-19 ― face a nerve-wracking choice between staying home and letting their health deteriorate or taking their chances with the virus to get their regular care.

An estimated 45% of Americans, or about 133 million people, have some kind of chronic medical condition, like diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and arthritis, according to an analysis published in 2018.

These ailments require ongoing care in the form of frequent doctor visits, lab tests, scans, and medications administered in medical facilities. But these facilities are also places where people can contract the coronavirus, making life-or-death decisions about other health care more complicated. 

“The

Read More

6 ways to motivate and inspire your employees that don’t involve a pay rise

Modern companies offer a lot of perks for employees: healthy breakfasts and fruits, medical insurance, massage right in the office, a gym with personal fitness coaches, and much more. Due to recent quarantine guidelines, most companies had to stop all office activities and move some of them online, such as training and fitness classes.

Even if you have a budget for perks, tangible and intangible methods of motivation should work together. People need to know that their work matters. Perks are great for attracting people, but they have a lesser effect on retaining them.

It’s critical to understand one fundamental thing though: benefits will not replace salary. A person works for money, having all the rest is good but secondary.

However, if pay cuts are needed due to the crisis, there are ways to retain and motivate your employees, as well as preserve high efficiency. Based on my experience of

Read More

Trump pushes state, local leaders to reopen schools in fall

President Donald Trump launched an all-out effort pressing state and local officials to reopen schools this fall, arguing that some are keeping schools closed not because of the risks from the coronavirus pandemic but for political reasons.

“They think it’s going to be good for them politically, so they keep the schools closed,” Trump said Tuesday at a White House discussion on school plans for the fall. “No way. We’re very much going to put pressure on governors and everybody else to open the schools.”

The White House’s round-table gathered health and education leaders from across the nation who said schools and colleges are ready to open this fall and can do so safely. They argued that the risks of keeping students at home outweigh any risks tied to the coronavirus, saying students need access to meal programs and mental and behavioral health services.

“We want to reopen the schools,”

Read More

Hoboken Coronavirus Testing Site Closes Temporarily; Updates

HOBOKEN, NJ — Hoboken Mayor Ravi Bhalla said in an update on Tuesday night that the city’s uptown coronavirus testing center will close from Wednesday through Sunday, but alternatives are being offered in nearby towns during that time.

“Dr. Brahmbhatt informed me that he is unavailable for the next three days, which will result in the Riverside testing site at 14th and Jefferson Street to be closed until Monday,” Bhalla said. “We wish Dr. Brahmbhatt and his staff a restful and well-deserved time off.”

Testing demand has remained high in this mile-square city of 53,000 people, particularly with the mayor recently saying that cases are rising again.

Over the past two days, the city’s volunteer emergency response team has fielded 400 calls for testing, Bhalla said.

In addition, Bhalla and Gov. Phil Murphy have said that New Jerseyans returning from 19 states with coronavirus spikes should get tested and self-quarantine

Read More

Ringo marks 80th at online gig with Beatles hits, celebrity tributes

Los Angeles (AFP) – Ringo Starr held an online 80th birthday bash Tuesday with a little help from his celebrity friends — and a number of classic Beatles songs — in aid of causes including Black Lives Matter.

But fans hoping for a virtual reunion between Starr and fellow surviving Beatle Paul McCartney were left disappointed, as the celebration concluded with an archive clip of the pair performing “Helter Skelter.”

Normally Starr marks each passing year with live performances that include fellow musicians and hundreds of fans, but the pandemic forced a rethink this time.

“As most of you know, I’m fond of a good birthday party… but this is a bad year to host a get-together of any kind,” said the British musician, sitting behind a drum kit wearing a colorful face mask adorned with the peace sign.

“So I’m celebrating with my friends in a new way this

Read More