Fitness

Australia deals with virus spike; Serbia erupts in violence

BELGRADE, Serbia (AP) — The reimposition of coronavirus lockdown measures in Serbia touched off violent clashes in the capital Belgrade that left at least 60 police and protesters hurt amid renewed warnings that the virus is still gathering pace.

Australia grappled with a COVID-19 spike in the city of Melbourne that prepared on Wednesday for a second lockdown to contain the virus’ spread. Melbourne’s virus woes contrasted sharply with other areas of the country that have been reporting low or no daily infections.

Africa surpassed the half million mark of coronavirus infections according to figures released Wednesday by the Africa Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. South Africa reported another day of more than 10,000 confirmed cases.

There’s no way to know the real number of confirmed virus cases among Africa’s 1.3 billion people as its 54 countries continue to face a serious shortage of testing materials for the virus.

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4 Ways You Were Conditioned To Hate Fitness As A Kid

Years of viewing fitness as punishment can take some time to repair. (Photo: Getty Images/HuffPost)
Years of viewing fitness as punishment can take some time to repair. (Photo: Getty Images/HuffPost)

Experiences we have when we’re young are incredibly formative ― especially when it comes to something like exercise.

Fitness isn’t just physical; it also has a major effect on the mind. If you have a positive outlook on it (or even just a tolerable one), the likelihood is pretty good that exercise will improve your mental health. But if you’ve had negative emotions about working out in the past, chances are that moving your body can cause more stress than you may even think is worth it.

Part of that stems from how you may have thought about exercise when you were young. There are a handful of subtle ways we can be conditioned to hate fitness as kids. Below are just a few of them:

Mandated School Fitness Tests And Curriculum

Requiring students to

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6 ways to motivate and inspire your employees that don’t involve a pay rise

Modern companies offer a lot of perks for employees: healthy breakfasts and fruits, medical insurance, massage right in the office, a gym with personal fitness coaches, and much more. Due to recent quarantine guidelines, most companies had to stop all office activities and move some of them online, such as training and fitness classes.

Even if you have a budget for perks, tangible and intangible methods of motivation should work together. People need to know that their work matters. Perks are great for attracting people, but they have a lesser effect on retaining them.

It’s critical to understand one fundamental thing though: benefits will not replace salary. A person works for money, having all the rest is good but secondary.

However, if pay cuts are needed due to the crisis, there are ways to retain and motivate your employees, as well as preserve high efficiency. Based on my experience of

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Hoboken Coronavirus Testing Site Closes Temporarily; Updates

HOBOKEN, NJ — Hoboken Mayor Ravi Bhalla said in an update on Tuesday night that the city’s uptown coronavirus testing center will close from Wednesday through Sunday, but alternatives are being offered in nearby towns during that time.

“Dr. Brahmbhatt informed me that he is unavailable for the next three days, which will result in the Riverside testing site at 14th and Jefferson Street to be closed until Monday,” Bhalla said. “We wish Dr. Brahmbhatt and his staff a restful and well-deserved time off.”

Testing demand has remained high in this mile-square city of 53,000 people, particularly with the mayor recently saying that cases are rising again.

Over the past two days, the city’s volunteer emergency response team has fielded 400 calls for testing, Bhalla said.

In addition, Bhalla and Gov. Phil Murphy have said that New Jerseyans returning from 19 states with coronavirus spikes should get tested and self-quarantine

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Black-Owned Health and Wellness Businesses to Support Now and Always

As the country is still grappling with the tragic death of George Floyd and the ongoing protests in its wake, musician and activist Calvin Martyr has launched #BlackOutDay2020 on July 7. This campaign calls for an economic boycott where the Black community pauses on buying to highlight their economic spending power. If they do spend money, they are encouraged to buy from Black-owned businesses only.

Just like the fashion and beauty industries, the wellness and health space is full of brands that are founded and run by Black women and men. Whether they’re selling aromatherapy candles, producing fitness-minded podcasts or shattering stigmas of what it means to be “well” for Black women, each of these companies was once just a dream and is now a hard-earned reality.

But don’t just shop these Black-owned businesses today, or this week. Support them regularly, engage with them on social media and spread the

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10 things that are selling out everywhere this summer

10 things that are selling out everywhere this summer
10 things that are selling out everywhere this summer

— Recommendations are independently chosen by Reviewed’s editors. Purchases you make through our links may earn us a commission.

Summer is in full swing—but following months of quarantine due to the coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic, it looks a little bit different this year. People have been spending more time in their own backyards, and outdoor recreation—like biking and roller skating—is more popular than ever. Here at Reviewed, we’ve spent the last few months tracking where to buy hard-to-find products, from hand sanitizer and toilet paper at the start of quarantine to bike helmets and loungewear more recently. 

While many of us have now adapted to the “new normal,” there are still some things that are in high demand (and low supply), including bikes, inflatable pools, and face masks. Below are 10 popular products that continue to sell out at retailers across the

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Brazil President Bolsonaro tests positive; biotechs Novavax, Regeneron say drugs almost ready

Brazil President Jair Bolsonaro said Tuesday that he has tested positive for COVID-19, and the U.S. coronavirus death toll has surpassed 130,000. But two U.S. pharmaceutical companies say they are closing in on drugs that could treat or even prevent COVID-19 within a few months.

A $450 million federal contract awarded Regeneron Pharmaceuticals could help get initial doses of their drug out by summer’s end, the company said. Another company, Novavax, claimed a $1.6 billion contract and said if testing goes well it hopes to deliver 100 million vaccine doses as early as late 2020.

The news comes as confirmed cases surge across most of the U.S.; Dr. Anthony Fauci said the country is “still knee-deep in the first wave of this.” Arizona is one hot spot: The state surpassed 100,000 cases Monday, and more than 62,000 of the 101,441 reported cases involve people younger than 44, state officials said.

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Casper’s massive mattress sale will save your aching back

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Casper has the mattress of your dreams, and it’s on sale for the 4th of July. (Photo: Casper)
Casper has the mattress of your dreams, and it’s on sale for the 4th of July. (Photo: Casper)

How’s your back? If you’re like most of us, these last few months of less activity (and more staying in) have meant noticeable aches and pains. Add to that the stress of sleeping on an old mattress and you might find your back in a constant state of discomfort. 

While core exercises are never a bad idea, no amount of Zoom fitness will fix your back if your bed is the root of the problem. Of course now is not the time to visit mattress stores and plop down Goldilocks-style in search of a match. But it IS

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Drug could be ready by summer’s end; Florida orders ‘brick and mortar’ schools to open; 130,000 US deaths

The U.S. coronavirus death toll has surpassed 130,000 but a U.S. pharmaceutical company says it could have initial doses of a drug ready by the end of summer that could treat or even prevent COVID-19.

A $450 million federal contract awarded Regeneron Pharmaceuticals could help get the drug to “many people quickly, hopefully helping to change the course of this deadly and still-raging pandemic,” the company said in a statement.

The news comes as confirmed cases surge across most of the U.S. – Dr. Anthony Fauci said the country is “still knee-deep in the first wave of this.” Arizona is one hot spot: The state surpassed 100,000 cases Monday, and more than 62,000 of the 101,441 reported cases involve people younger than 44, state officials said.

In Florida, another hot spot, the fall semester begins next month for public schools. The state’s education chief ordered school boards to “open brick

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Bottled holy water, sterilized pebbles

DUBAI, United Arab Emirates (AP) — Saudi Arabia has issued guidelines for about 1,000 pilgrims who will be allowed to perform the hajj pilgrimage in Mecca later this month, an experience that will be unlike any before because of the coronavirus pandemic.

The pilgrims will be only be able to drink holy water from the Zamzam well in Mecca that is packaged in plastic bottles, and pebbles for casting away evil that are usually picked up by pilgrims along hajj routes will be sterilized and bagged ahead of time. Pilgrims will also have to bring their own prayer rugs.

The guidelines were announced Monday as Saudi authorities prepare for a very limited hajj, which for the first time will not include pilgrims from outside the country. Instead, the kingdom said that 70% of pilgrims allowed to make the pilgrimage this year will be from among foreign residents of Saudi Arabia

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