Medicine

Walgreens to open 500 to 700 in-store clinics with primary care doctors in deal with VillageMD

The doctor will see you now … at Walgreens.

Walgreens plans to staff 500 to 700 of its stores with primary care doctors in the next five years in a partnership with medical services provider VillageMD.

The company, which has nearly 9,300 locations in the U.S., announced the plan Wednesday morning, saying it would also invest in VillageMD.

It will open the primary care clinics under the brand Village Medical at Walgreens. The clinics will be spread out among more than 30 markets, with more than half located in locations that are underserved by medical professionals.

The move marks the latest evolution in the drug store sector’s pivot away from retail floor space toward more healthcare services.

Walgreens’ archrival, CVS, has invested in its own in-store clinical services brand called MinuteClinic, which is offered at about 1,100 locations. CVS is also opening up to 1,500 HealthHUB locations that will include

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COVID Fear Is Keeping Chronically Ill People From Getting Medical Care

The novel coronavirus pandemic is keeping Americans away from the doctor’s office. For most people, that means little more than postponing a dental checkup or enduring a minor illness at home. 

But those with chronic medical conditions ― especially ailments that make them more susceptible to infections like COVID-19 ― face a nerve-wracking choice between staying home and letting their health deteriorate or taking their chances with the virus to get their regular care.

An estimated 45% of Americans, or about 133 million people, have some kind of chronic medical condition, like diabetes, high blood pressure, heart disease and arthritis, according to an analysis published in 2018.

These ailments require ongoing care in the form of frequent doctor visits, lab tests, scans, and medications administered in medical facilities. But these facilities are also places where people can contract the coronavirus, making life-or-death decisions about other health care more complicated. 

“The

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Myriad Genetics, OptraHEALTH Partner to Offer Cancer Knowledge

Myriad Genetics, Inc. MYGN recently announced a collaboration with OptraHEALTH with the aim of implementing a cognitive ChatBOT, Gene. The AI-powered ChatBOT will provide genetic and financial assistance information to prospective patients of hereditary cancer.

Notably, the Gene knowledge platform, which is a Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant, has a BOT interface and can answer a variety of health-related questions about hereditary cancer. The ChatBOT interfaces with Myriad’s online hereditary cancer quiz.

Myriad Genetics is currently planning to launch the Gene ChatBOT for its Foresight and Prequel prenatal tests and for companion diagnostic testing in oncology in the latter half of 2020.

With the recent partnership, Myriad Genetics aims to boost its oncology portfolio on a global scale. This portfolio includes various molecular diagnostic tests, all of which comprise the broader Molecular Diagnostic Testing business.

More on Gene

The ChatBOT Gene is designed to automate a pre-test process

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Coronavirus is revolutionizing scientific practices and communication. Here’s how.

MILWAUKEE – In June 2019, a team of scientists and editors launched an online server where medical researchers could submit articles. The team’s goal was to help the medical community more quickly share research findings and learn from one another. 

By the end of the year, the team was receiving about 75 submissions per week.

Then COVID-19 appeared. 

Now, nearly that many submissions come in each day.

“I’m thrilled, I’m really thrilled!” said Harlan Krumholz, one of the founders of the server, medRxiv (pronounced “med archive”). “It’s really speeding the ability for scientists to be able to communicate with each other and understand what each other is doing.”

Just as everyday life has been affected by COVID-19, science itself has changed.

Related video: Food service workers struggle with working through COVID-19

Faced with a brand new, incurable and deadly disease, scientists have had to learn how to produce meaningful information

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5 ways to have multiple orgasms for intense, longer-lasting sex

Masturbating on your own may lead to more orgasms when you're with your partner.
Masturbating on your own may lead to more orgasms when you’re with your partner.

Westend61/Getty Images

  • You can have multiple orgasms by taking breaks during sex, practicing kegel exercises, stimulating different areas each time, and more.

  • Edging, which refers to purposely delaying an orgasm, may lead to a continuous string of orgasms.

  • You can also try tightening your pelvic floor while you masturbate, which can lead to greater arousal. 

  • This article was medically reviewed by Rosara Torrisi, LCSW, CST, MSSW, MEd, PhD, Certified Sex therapist at the Long Island Institute of Sex Therapy (LIIST).

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Having multiple orgasms may be easy for some. For others, you may need some work to get there. 

Just remember that it’s not about the number of orgasms you have per sexual encounter. It’s about getting the most pleasure out of your experience. For some, one orgasm is enough,

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Younger people are driving new cases of COVID-19, putting the elderly at risk

People under 40 now make up the majority of COVID-19 cases, according to a USA TODAY analysis of data from 17 states. We found that the average age of a new person reported to have coronavirus has fallen significantly since March. 

Though we are now seeing more infections among young people, the elderly suffer more severe outcomes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 8 out of 10 COVID-19-related deaths reported in the U.S. have been among adults aged 65 and older. Young people may be spreading the virus to more vulnerable Americans.

COVID-19 cases vs. deaths

In Lousiana, coronavirus has already killed more than 2,000 people over 80, compared with just 14 deaths in patients under 30. As of Thursday, the number of infected people doubled in less than a week.

In Idaho, which has seen a 54% spike in cases since last week, patients between 18

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the exercise that everyone should be doing

Members of the Hazda Tribe squat rather than sit - C David A. Raichlen/University of Southern California/ PA
Members of the Hazda Tribe squat rather than sit – C David A. Raichlen/University of Southern California/ PA

By now, we know that spending too much time sitting down could take years off our life. Several studies have shown that increased periods of time spent sitting down could put us at greater risk of obesity, heart disease and type 2 diabetes. You only need to look Online Gambling’s models of future Netflix addicts – red-eyes, washed out pale skin and morbidly overweight bodies – to be put off ever touching base with your sofa again. 

But not so fast. The key to good health could lie in the way we choose to sit, rather than how much time we spend in sedentary positions. A study published in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences looked at the habits of the Hadza tribe who live in Tanzania, East Africa;

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COVID-19 vaccine candidates secure funds; Lysol gets EPA nod

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Tuesday related to the national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

________________________

FOOD & SHOPPING:

— Overall retail sales are expected to fall this year, but there’s one bright spot: online shopping. E-commerce sales are expected to rise 18% this year, with most of that spending going to Amazon and Walmart, according to market research firm eMarketer. The increase was helped by the popularity of services like buy online and pick up curbside. The pandemic has also forced some to shop online for the first time: online shopping among those 65 and older is expected to rise 12% this year.

— Good Times Restaurants, which runs Bad Daddy’s Burger Bar and Good Times Burgers & Frozen Custard, is reporting fiscal third-quarter same-store sales for Bad

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Popular Heartburn Drugs Linked to Heightened COVID-19 Risk

A popular form of heartburn medication may increase a person’s risk of developing COVID-19, according to a new study, lengthening the already long list of risk factors for the virus.

In the study, published Tuesday in pre-print form in the American Journal of Gastroenterology, scientists led by Cedars-Sinai Medical Center’s Dr. Brennan Spiegel conducted an online survey involving more than 86,000 people. Among them, more than 53,000 reported abdominal pain or discomfort, acid reflux, heartburn or regurgitation, and answered questions about the medications they took to relieve those symptoms. Of those, more than 3,300 tested positive for COVID-19.

When the researchers analyzed the data, they found that respondents who said they used proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medications to treat their heartburn had anywhere from two to four times the risk of testing positive for COVID-19, compared to people not using such medications. PPI drugs, which are available by prescription and

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Exotic meats are a Chinese delicacy. But they’re causing concern about another outbreak.

Ou Yang is having a hard time finding snake to eat.

“A very famous restaurant specialized in cooking snakes in my city already stopped providing such dishes,” Ou told NBC News from Foshan, in southern China, where snake has long been regarded as a delicacy. “They are all banned now.”

As the world struggles to contain the coronavirus pandemic, China is clamping down on the sale of wildlife for human consumption amid concerns about another outbreak of a zoonotic disease. What began as a temporary ban to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 is making legislative leaps to a broader ban on the practice — a move international public health and wildlife experts have been urging for years.

While it means Ou will have to forgo his dinners of snakes, crocodiles, boars and bamboo rats, he understands the reasoning.

“I think the ban is helpful to maintain public health safety,” he

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