Medicine

An economist who collected coronavirus data from 841 childcare centers explains how parents should decide whether to send kids back to school

reopening schools
reopening schools

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  • As cities start opening up, parents face the tough decision of whether to send children who’ve been stuck at home for months to daycare, or school. 

  • To help parents with that decision, Emily Oster, an economist, collected coronavirus data from childcare centers that have stayed open during the pandemic. 

  • The data pointed to low transmission rates among both children and staff.

  • Still, Oster acknowledged that the childcare decision is a personal one and that there are “no easy answers.”

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Since the pandemic hit, Emily Oster — an economist who’s authored two books on parenting and pregnancy— has been using available data to respond to families’ pressing concerns about the coronavirus. She’s touched on topics like how to safely visit grandparents and the risks the virus poses in pregnant women.

Lately, Oster’s received an outpouring of questions from parents about whether to

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Will We Ever Have Sex Again? An Investigation

One sunny day in May, a man named Ashrita Furman took a samurai sword and sliced 31 watermelons open on his own stomach in under one minute, making it one of 600 times he has set a Guinness World Record. 

I have set zero Guinness World Records, but I’ve been thinking about how much I have in common with Furman lately, whom I first learned about in a New Yorker profile in 2011, which stated, “He has never driven a car, and he is celibate.”

But that’s me, I thought, taking a swig of skim milk and checking my powder-blue Baby-G watch to make sure I wasn’t missing Gossip Girl. “I don’t know how to drive a car. I’ve never had sex with anyone.”

Almost 10 years later, I’m exactly where I was when I first read about Furman: living in my parents’ house, still totally unable to

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Fauci says new cases could hit 100,000 daily; new ‘pandemic potential’ found in China; Arizona delays school openings

A new pandemic threat could be simmering in China while at home the nation’s leading infectious disease expert warned that new cases could reach 100,000 per day if the trend isn’t averted.

“I think it is important to tell you and the American public that I’m very concerned because it could get very bad,” said Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

More states are tightening restrictions aimed at tamping down the alarming boom in coronavirus cases. New York, New Jersey and Connecticut doubled the number of states on its quarantine list, to 16. Arizona delayed the start for in-class learning for the 2020-21 school year. Oregon and Kansas are the latest states that will begin to require face masks in public.

In China, researchers are concerned about a new swine flu strain in pigs that could have “pandemic potential.” Fauci, however, said the

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LloydsPharmacy and Deliveroo launch partnership to deliver medication to your door within 30 minutes

Many restaurants and takeaway services are offering discounts and delivering free meals to NHS workers: Getty
Many restaurants and takeaway services are offering discounts and delivering free meals to NHS workers: Getty

LloydsPharmacy and Deliveroo have teamed up to help bring medication to your door within 30 minutes.

The partnership means that customers will be able to order more than 50 medical essentials, including over-the-counter medicines, for delivery from 16 LloydsPharmacy stores across the UK.

The two companies state that the delivery service will prove especially important for those who are isolating at home due to Covid-19 and the elderly.

Starting this week, delivery is available to customers from shops in cities, including Southampton, Cardiff, Edinburgh, Bristol, Newcastle upon Tyne, Cambridge and Coventry.

The partnership will then roll-out to a further 24 stores across the UK.

A range of LloydsPharmacy’s 50 best-selling products will be available to purchase via Deliveroo’s app, such as PPE including face masks, hand sanitiser and gloves, as well as hay fever

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Will We Ever Have Sex Again? An Investigation.

One sunny day in May, a man named Ashrita Furman took a samurai sword and sliced 31 watermelons open on his own stomach in under one minute, making it one of 600 times he has set a Guinness World Record. 

I have set zero Guinness World Records, but I’ve been thinking about how much I have in common with Furman lately, who I first learned about in a New Yorker profile in 2011, which stated, “He has never driven a car, and he is celibate.”

“But that’s me,” I thought, taking a swig of skim milk and checking my powder blue Baby-G watch to make sure I wasn’t missing Gossip Girl. “I don’t know how to drive a car. I’ve never had sex with anyone.”

Almost ten years later, I’m exactly where I was when I first read about Furman: Living in my parents’ house, still totally unable

Read More

New ‘pandemic potential’ found in China; Arizona delays opening of schools; kids sports march on

A new pandemic threat could be simmering in China while at home more states are tightening restrictions aimed at tamping down an alarming boom in coronavirus cases.

Arizona delayed the start for in-class learning for the 2020-21 school year. Oregon and Kansas are the latest states that will begin to require face masks in public.

“Modeling from the Oregon Health Authority shows that if we don’t take further action to reduce the spread of the disease, our hospitals could be overwhelmed by new COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations within weeks,” Oregon Gov. Kate Brown said. “The choices every single one of us make in the coming days matter.”

In New Jersey, Gov. Phil Murphy announced late Monday that the state would pause its planned reopening for indoor dining and banned smoking and drinking at Atlantic City casinos set to reopen this week.

And in China, researchers are concerned about a new

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Students react to colleges’ reopening plans with mix of optimism, fear

Arriving on campus kick-starts a year of firsts for college freshmen, and Abbey Shea was excited about all of them. Her first introduction to new roommates who may become lifelong friends, first semester away from home, first foray into independence.

And then her Port Orange, Florida, high school postponed its graduation ceremony because of the coronavirus. Uncertainty set in, and Shea braced herself for “a new normal,” she said — a college experience far different from the social mecca she’d imagined. 

“I’m trying to open myself up more,” said Shea, 18, who selected Nova Southeastern University in Fort Lauderdale as much for its diverse student population as for academic reasons. Now, she worries pandemic-related rules will smother her interpersonal goals. “I know it’s not going to be the same.”

Though Nova, a private university, has yet to publish a comprehensive outline for the fall semester, the Florida State University System’s

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How To Properly Dry Your Hands To Stop The Spread Of The Coronavirus

The coronavirus pandemic has forced us to reevaluate a lot about our hygiene habits ― including how we dry our hands in public. 

Experts we spoke to recently said drying your hands is almost as important as washing them, and the method you use has an impact.

Are paper towels preferable in a public restroom ― or are air-dryers the way to go? Although some experts still debate this topic, more often than not, they say paper towel is king.

“I’d say the best way to dry your hands is with a paper towel that you discard afterwards,” said Sandra Kesh, a deputy medical director and infectious disease specialist at Westmed Medical Group in Westchester, New York. 

Kesh explained that the goal of washing and drying is to remove as many viral particles as you can while also avoiding passing those germs on to any environmental surfaces nearby.

Air dryers

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Dinosaurs, fossils and other homeschooling resources

As your new-found role as a teacher, there's plenty of free online help to make it as smooth as possible: iStock
As your new-found role as a teacher, there’s plenty of free online help to make it as smooth as possible: iStock

Primary schools in England are now open for pupils in reception, year 1 and year 6 in smaller class sizes, as well as all children of critical workers and vulnerable children, thanks to the latest easing of lockdown restrictions.

From 15 June, teachers from secondary schools and further education colleges have been providing face to face support for year 10 and 12 students too, who are preparing for exams next year, however, only a quarter of these pupils will be in school at any one time.

While this has alleviated the role of teacher for parents, if you’re child is continuing to study from home, we’ve found all the best resources to help.

In April, the BBC launched an extended version of its Bitesize educational website. Students can now

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High Risk for Coronavirus | Protect Yourself

Consumer Reports has no financial relationship with advertisers on this site.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues unfolding around the globe, people who are at higher risk for severe disease need to take special care.

COVID-19 appears to cause mild to moderate symptoms in most people who are infected. And some people seem to have no apparent effects from the virus.

But the older you are, the greater your risk for hospitalization, admission to an intensive care unit, being placed on a ventilator, and death, according to new guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

For instance, people in their 50s are at higher risk than those in their 40s, and those in their 60s and 70s are at greater risk than those in their 50s, the CDC says. People 85 and older are at the greatest risk. (In the U.S., about 8 in 10 deaths from COVID-19 are

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