Supplement

Back-to-School Shopping Will Experience New Shifts in Consumer Behavior Amid Uncertainty

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According to data from Deloitte consumers plan to spend $10.4 billion online this back-to-school season, up from $8.1 billion in 2019.

For many families, b-t-s shopping is an annual ritual to stock up on backpacks, school supplies and new clothes for the school year. But in the wake of the coronavirus pandemic research from Deloitte suggests this year’s shopping will look a bit different. After 12 years of observing the b-t-s season, Deloitte noted in its 2020 b-t-s report that nothing has caused disruption to families, schools, and retailers like COVID-19.

While b-t-s typically marks a time of transition, this year is lingering in a time of uncertainty. For back-to-college shoppers, this uncertainty is influencing overall consumer behavior. In its survey, Deloitte found 62 percent of parents are anxious about sending kids back to college as coronavirus continues to linger. In fact, concerns

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If Your Vitamins Are Missing These Ingredients, You’re Shopping Wrong

Have you ever browsed the aisles of your local drugstore or scrolled through Amazon, trying to figure out exactly which supplement is best? You might want to start taking vitamin D, but just looking at all the ones that are for sale out there can seem overwhelming. So you inevitably choose the one with the highest ratings or the coolest-looking bottle or the kind that you’ve seen on your friend’s kitchen counter.

While it can be easy to go with something that’s popular or that your friends trust, there are some things to keep in mind when shopping for vitamins. You’ll want to be sure that what you’re buying is actually effective and safe—because who wants to shell out money for something that isn’t going to help you at all?

And it’s important to note that your diet should always come first when it comes to getting those nutrients you

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The best student discounts we found for 2020

Shopping

Amazon Prime

Student version

Amazon

If you’re not piggy-backing off of your parents’ Amazon Prime account, you can have the subscription for less while you’re in school. College students can get Prime Student for $6.50 per month or $60 per year, and it includes the same perks as a standard Prime membership including free two-day shipping, free same-day delivery in select areas, and access to the entire Prime Video library. Amazon also currently offers a six-month free trial, so you’ll pay even less during your first year.

Buy Prime Student at Amazon – $60/year

Shipt

Shipt is similar to DoorDash but for groceries and household essentials: Pay an annual fee and you can get same-day delivery from numerous stores including Target, Costco and CVS. Shipt’s student plan costs $50 for the year — a 50-percent discount from the normal price — and you get the first two weeks free. Just double

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Edited Transcript of JW.A earnings conference call or presentation 11-Jun-20 2:00pm GMT

HOBOKEN Jul 5, 2020 (Thomson StreetEvents) — Edited Transcript of John Wiley & Sons Inc earnings conference call or presentation Thursday, June 11, 2020 at 2:00:00pm GMT

John Wiley & Sons, Inc. – VP, IR

* Brian A. Napack

John Wiley & Sons, Inc. – President, CEO & Director

* John A. Kritzmacher

John Wiley & Sons, Inc. – Executive VP of Operation, CFO & Interim CAO

CJS Securities, Inc. – MD of Research

Good morning. And welcome to Wiley’s Fourth Quarter Fiscal Year 2020 Earnings Call. As a reminder, this conference is being recorded.

At this time, I’d like to introduce Wiley’s Vice President of Investor Relations, Brian Campbell. Please go ahead.

Brian Campbell, John Wiley & Sons, Inc. – VP, IR [2]

Good morning. And welcome to Wiley’s Fourth Quarter and Fiscal 2020 Earnings Update. On the call with me are Brian Napack, our President and Chief Executive … Read More

With gyms closed and at-home workout equipment sold out, fitness lovers get creative

With many gyms closed because of the coronavirus pandemic, WFH is making way for WOFH: Working Out From Home.

“I use a lot of makeshift materials to work out,” says Anne Barreca, of Brooklyn, New York. Without access to a gym or swimming pool, she uses what’s in her environment for exercise, including the stairs leading to her third-floor walkup, groceries, resistance bands, furniture sliders, dish towels — even her 5-month-old son, Benjamin, whom she calls “the world’s cutest kettlebell.” He’s the perfect size for squats and lunges (“comes with the noises too,” her husband, Brian, jokes).

Image: Anne Barreca (Courtesy of Barreca family)
Image: Anne Barreca (Courtesy of Barreca family)

“It’s better than nothing,” Barreca said. “Something is always better than just being lazy or sitting around. … There’s no such thing as a perfect workout.”

Exercising using one’s body weight or with what’s available, of course, isn’t a new phenomenon.

In 1976’s “Rocky,” the underdog

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Think WFH is a challenge? Not compared to WOFH: Working Out From Home

With many gyms closed because of the coronavirus pandemic, WFH is making way for WOFH: Working Out From Home.

“I use a lot of makeshift materials to work out,” says Anne Barreca, of Brooklyn, New York. Without access to a gym or swimming pool, she uses what’s in her environment for exercise, including the stairs leading to her third-floor walkup, groceries, resistance bands, furniture sliders, dish towels — even her 5-month-old son, Benjamin, whom she calls “the world’s cutest kettlebell.” He’s the perfect size for squats and lunges (“comes with the noises too,” her husband, Brian, jokes).

Image: Anne Barreca (Courtesy of Barreca family)
Image: Anne Barreca (Courtesy of Barreca family)

“It’s better than nothing,” Barreca said. “Something is always better than just being lazy or sitting around. … There’s no such thing as a perfect workout.”

Exercising using one’s body weight or with what’s available, of course, isn’t a new phenomenon.

In 1976’s “Rocky,” the underdog

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Nord Stream 2 Could Sever Transatlantic Ties

(Bloomberg Opinion) — U.S. President Donald Trump is furious at Germany for many reasons, not all of them fathomable. In phone conversations with Angela Merkel, he’s allegedly called the German chancellor “stupid” and denigrated her in “near-sadistic” tones. Though this be madness, as the Bard might say, there is — on rare occasions — method in it. One such case is Nord Stream 2.

It is an almost-finished gas pipeline under the Baltic Sea between Russia and Germany, running right next to the original Nord Stream, which has been in operation since 2011. “We’re supposed to protect Germany from Russia, but Germany is paying Russia billions of dollars for energy coming from a pipeline,” Trump roared at a recent campaign rally. “Excuse me, how does that work?”

As is his wont, the president thereby conflated many things. One of his grievances is that Germany has long been scrimping on its 

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If Schools Are Open This Fall, Certain Kids Should Be Given Priority For In-Person Attendance

At this point, no one knows for sure what will happen with school next year. There’s a lot of talking and planning, but I think most of us realize that safely returning the nation’s approximately 56 million schoolchildren to school, along with their teachers, is going to be an absolute (and very risky) shitshow.

First, there is the issue of whether returning to school is safe. The new AAP guidelines assure parents that children usually get mild cases of COVID-19, and because of this, they usually don’t transmit the virus as easily to others. As the AAP explains, “Although many questions remain, the preponderance of evidence indicates that children and adolescents are less likely to be symptomatic and less likely to have severe disease resulting from SARS-CoV-2.” 

But note the language they are using here — “less likely” does not mean not that certain kids won’t get very sick

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How to get a healthy gut and boost immunity in the face of Covid-19

d - Hiroshi Watanabe/Getty images
d – Hiroshi Watanabe/Getty images

It’s hardly surprising that functional health doctors are in high demand right now. Dr. Sabine Donnai, founder of Viavi Health Strategy has been busy preparing her clients to be in the best health of their lives from the onset of the coronavirus pandemic. Charging an eye watering £10,000 a year, she prescribes highly individualised lifestyle plans to maximise health and well-being and decelerate ageing.

While the average person won’t have access to Viavi’s premium health service, one of the most important things Dr. Donnai advocates before any medical intervention, is to improve gut health to optimize immunity, something she says is simple to do yourself at home with a few key diet tweaks.

‘Improving your gut health won’t stop you from contracting Covid-19 but there are studies coming out now that show a link between the gut microbiome and Covid, which means maintaining a healthy

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Meet the Finest Bombers, Fighters, Aircraft Carriers, and Submarines Ever Made

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Key Point: These weapon platforms are the ones everyone wanted. Here is the definitive list.

In today’s world, where everyday it seems a new piece of military technology is poised to take over the battlefield and make everything else obsolete, there are several weapons of war that seem to have some staying power. 

Aircraft carriers, while some may consider them obsolete, remain one of the ultimate ways to display national power and prestige, with the unique capability to attack targets from the world’s seas with deadly accuracy.

Submarines have many uses. Whether it is to exercise sea control, deter an enemy with underwater nuclear weapons or ensure you have the ability to strike with various types of conventional weapons like cruise missiles on land, subs seem to be only gaining in prominence. 

Then there is the bomber. Some are old, like the B-52.

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