Black

Virus, Floyd death merge in brutal blow to Black well-being

Doctors have known it for a long time, well before the resounding cries of “Black Lives Matter”: Black people suffer disproportionately.

They face countless challenges to good health, among them food, transportation and income. The stress of living with racism has very real, physical effects. And they are especially prone to diabetes, hypertension and other chronic diseases that can be tricky to manage even in normal times.

Then came COVID-19 and George Floyd — one killing Black people in alarming numbers, the other shining a harsh light on systemic racism. In a matter of months and nearly 8 minutes, it became clear that institutions designed to ensure the two most important things in life — health and safety — had converged to turn against one segment of the population in stark, horrific ways.

It’s a brutal blow to Black people’s well-being and renewed calls for racial justice in all realms

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Restaurant Co-Owner Cites Husband’s Mental Health After He Refuses Black Customer in ‘I Can’t Breathe’ Shirt

A number of people assembled outside a Maryland restaurant on Sunday after a customer said he wasn’t permitted inside because he was wearing a shirt that said “I can’t breathe,” a reference to George Floyd and others who have been killed by the police.

Located in Prince George county, protestors called for the Fish Market to shut down for the day, Fox 5 reports. The community was outraged after customer Daryl Rollins, who is Black, shared his experience online. He explained that on Friday, one of the owners, Rick Giovannoni, wouldn’t let him inside the restaurant when he saw Rollins’ shirt.

“He came over and told me, ‘Why do you have that shirt on? I seen the video. It was terrible. Why would you wear that shirt? You cannot come into my establishment like that,’” Rollins said. He said the owner was likely referring to the video of Floyd’s death,

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How to Support the Black LGBTQ+ Community Not Just Now, But Always

Photo credit: Hearst Owned
Photo credit: Hearst Owned

From Esquire

If Pride is a year-round celebration, then our solidarity should be, too. And amidst a national uprising for the Black Lives Matter movement, Pride 2020 has undoubtedly been one energized with a revived momentum towards racial justice.

City streets typically scattered with pink-washed corporate tents and rainbow swag are now being occupied by protesters marching for the end of police brutality and systemic racism against the Black community. Resources that would typically be spent on Pride celebrations are being redirected towards Black LGBTQ+-oriented bail funds and mutual aid organizations. Pride 2020’s call for direct action and Black liberation has brought the LGBTQ+ community closer to its roots than it has been in decades. It is a reminder of the Black leaders of the Stonewall uprisings and queer liberation movement—those to whom many of us owe our very right to celebrate.

However, just as we

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How Black Creators Kept Us Going During Quarantine Season

Anxiety around the coronavirus is common for everyone right now, but with news that Black people are four times more likely to die from the virus than their white counterparts, there is a collective weariness among the Black community. The innovative and responsive creative output of Black creators has been a respite from the heaviness that rests on each of us as COVID-19 not only impacts our lives, but the lives of those we deeply love and care for. 

Each and every night, social media sites such as Instagram Live felt like using a Sky Box for the first time: inundated with choice. Feeds were alight with pink glowing circles as people launched game shows, hosted talks, played music, led workout sessions and instructed bake-a-longs. There is no doubt that Black content creators pushed boundaries during lockdown season and gave us small pockets of joy during such an uncertain time. 

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As Black creators gain sudden exposure on TikTok and Instagram, social media platforms begin to acknowledge inherent biases

Black content creators call on followers and social media platforms to acknowledge systematic racism. (Photo: Instagram/heybriajones/areed_1998)
Black content creators call on followers and social media platforms to acknowledge systematic racism. (Photo: Instagram/heybriajones/areed_1998)

The social media landscape has been transformed amid conversations regarding racial injustice and the Black Lives Matter movement, sparked by the killings of George Floyd, Breonna Taylor and Ahmaud Arbery. While people from all backgrounds are participating in these discussions and using their platforms to provide information and resources for their followers, it’s Black content creators in particular who have seen a spike in their engagement and follower count on sites like Instagram and TikTok. And with social networks actively giving a boost to these creators’ posts, some feel this is the first time that they’re being both seen and heard by those who ordinarily wouldn’t follow them.

“My platform has blown up. I just hit 30,000 [31,700 as of publishing time] on Instagram, and last week I had, like, 24,000 [followers before]. And

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Black Trans Lives Matter, Too

On Sunday, June 14, thousands of protesters gathered outside the Brooklyn Museum in New York City in a powerful demonstration supporting the Black trans community, demanding justice for recent lives lost, as well as the disproportionate violence Black trans people face in this country. As people across the country and around the world participate in Black Lives Matter protests fighting for racial justice, it’s important to actively include and speak up for the LGBTQ+ community as part of the conversation.

On May 3, Black trans woman Nina Pop was stabbed to death in a possible hate crime, and a few weeks later, on May 27, Tony McDade, a Black trans man, was fatally shot by police. Just last week, on June 8 and 9, two Black trans women, Dominique “Rem’mie” Fells and Riah Milton, were tragically killed within a 24-hour period. Fells’s disturbing death was ruled a homicide, while Milton

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5 meaningful Father’s Day ideas amid Black Lives Matter, Pride Month and the COVID-19 pandemic

Father’s Day 2020 is another occasion that feels significantly different than the year prior.

Sunday, the day devoted to dads may conjure up thoughts of George Floyd, a father whose death in police custody ignited nation-wide protests demanding justice and racial equality. Or perhaps, one might think of his daughter Gianna, 6, who, as seen in a clip that has gone viral, understands “Daddy changed the world.”  

There are also those still separated from their fathers due to the global health crisis. Some who live close to dad might be staying away to reduce his risk of infection. Others might not feel safe traveling to see pops just yet. 

June is also Pride Month, when members of the LGBTQ community come together to recognize the progress they’ve made since the 1969 Stonewall Riots. 

Here are some ways to have a meaningful Father’s Day.

Celebrating Pride Month and rallying for racial

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Black Americans most likely to know a COVID-19 victim

DETROIT (AP) — African Americans are disproportionately likely to say a family member or close friend has died of COVID-19 or respiratory illness since March, according to a series of surveys conducted since April that lays bare how black Americans have borne the brunt of the pandemic.

Eleven percent of African Americans say they were close with someone who has died from the coronavirus, compared with 5% of Americans overall and 4% of white Americans.

The findings are based on data from three COVID Impact surveys conducted between April and June by NORC at the University of Chicago for the Data Foundation about the pandemic’s effect on the physical, mental and social health of Americans.

While recent surveys conducted by the AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research have found that black Americans are especially likely to know someone who had the virus, the new data from the COVID Impact research

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Melinda Gates didn’t exactly say Black people ‘must’ be vaccinated for COVID-19

The claim: Melinda Gates says Black people must be vaccinated first for COVID-19 after health care workers.

Melinda Gates, philanthropist and co-founder of the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, says that after health care workers, Black people must be next in line for vaccination for COVID-19, according to a story on Live24.

Gates, in a Time magazine interview on the eve of global vaccine summit in early June, discussed how anti-racism protests following the death of George Floyd, an African American man, while in custody of Minneapolis police fits into health equity, especially with development of a COVID-19 vaccine.

“The first people that need this vaccine are the 60 million health care workers around the world. They deserve to get it before anybody else. Then you start tiering,” 24Live quoted Gates as saying in the Time story, written by Jamie Ducharme.

A shift in wording

That quote matched the one

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Accessible Mental Health Resources for Black Women

If you need mental health assistance right now, call the NAMI Helpline at 800-950-NAMI or text “NAMI” to 741741.


Black lives matter, and so does Black mental health. The Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health reports that African Americans are 10 percent more likely to experience serious psychological distress. At the same time, only 30 percent of African American adults with mental illnesses get help each year, which is below the U.S. average of 43 percent.

Racism and racial trauma continue to affect the mental well-being of Black people, who already face so many obstacles when it comes to receiving mental health treatment. As the National Alliance on Mental Illness stated, “Racism is a public health crisis.”

If you feel like the continued incidents of police brutality and lack of injustice for Black lives (on top of living in a society that upholds systems of racism) are taking

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