COVID19

COVID-19 in Canada: Ontario Premier Doug Ford has clear message for visiting Americans: ‘Not right now’

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 107,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and more than 8,700 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

July 10

2:00 p.m.: ‘Not right now’ Ontario’s premier says to American visitors

At a press conference in Woodbridge, Ont.

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How can you volunteer for an experimental COVID-19 vaccine? Start with this survey

If you want to sign up to bring scientists one step closer to discovering a successful coronavirus vaccine, then now is your time.

The National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases designed a “COVID-19 Prevention Trials Network” (COVPN) to help recruit the thousands of volunteers needed to determine which of a variety of “investigational vaccines” and antibody treatments protect people from the pathogen that has so far taken the lives of over half a million worldwide.

The first of the clinical trials to be conducted by COVPN will begin this summer and will test mRNA-1273, the vaccine candidate developed by biotechnology company Moderna, according to a news release by the National Institutes of Health.

The network is intended to conduct Phase 3 studies, meaning researchers will be able to learn if the products can actually prevent new coronavirus infections or if they help control the disease if not.

All you

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Here’s how small businesses threatened by COVID-19 are surviving the pandemic

With the unemployment rate at 11.1% and businesses shut down in every state, COVID-19 has taken a crippling toll on America’s economic health.

MORE: Small businesses rethink their approach amid the pandemic to serve their customers

For many small businesses, which comprise 47% of private-sector payrolls in the U.S., according to the Small Business and Entrepreneurship Council, the sudden economic downturn has created a full-blown crisis.

MORE: When coronavirus hit, these small businesses got creative, but they still need help

The big-picture concern shared by economists is if businesses don’t survive, many Americans won’t have jobs to return to after the pandemic. That’s why experts have said it’s important to support local businesses, which are struggling to generate reliable income.

Now, salons, restaurants, florists and fitness instructors, among others, are creatively adjusting to the new realities of the coronavirus economy, pivoting to bringing parts of their business online, connecting with

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Lawmakers request monthly COVID-19 misinformation reports from online platforms

“Over the past several months, we have seen a troubling rise of false or misleading information related to COVID-19 disseminated by domestic and foreign actors on platforms such as yours. This disinformation has ranged from false statements about certain groups being immune from contracting the virus to unsubstantiated assertions about masks and vaccines. This type of disinformation is dangerous and can affect the health and well-being of people who use this false information to make critical health decisions during this pandemic.”

The tech giants reportedly agreed to provide the European Commission with detailed monthly disinformation reports back in June, and that’s something the lawmakers noted in their letters. “[W]e request that your company provide the Committee with monthly reports similar in scope to what you are providing the European Commission regarding your COVID-19 disinformation efforts as they relate to United States users of your platform,” they added.

There are plenty

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Younger people are driving new cases of COVID-19, putting the elderly at risk

People under 40 now make up the majority of COVID-19 cases, according to a USA TODAY analysis of data from 17 states. We found that the average age of a new person reported to have coronavirus has fallen significantly since March. 

Though we are now seeing more infections among young people, the elderly suffer more severe outcomes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 8 out of 10 COVID-19-related deaths reported in the U.S. have been among adults aged 65 and older. Young people may be spreading the virus to more vulnerable Americans.

COVID-19 cases vs. deaths

In Lousiana, coronavirus has already killed more than 2,000 people over 80, compared with just 14 deaths in patients under 30. As of Thursday, the number of infected people doubled in less than a week.

In Idaho, which has seen a 54% spike in cases since last week, patients between 18

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COVID-19 vaccine candidates secure funds; Lysol gets EPA nod

The outbreak of the coronavirus has dealt a shock to the global economy with unprecedented speed. Following are developments Tuesday related to the national and global response, the work place and the spread of the virus.

________________________

FOOD & SHOPPING:

— Overall retail sales are expected to fall this year, but there’s one bright spot: online shopping. E-commerce sales are expected to rise 18% this year, with most of that spending going to Amazon and Walmart, according to market research firm eMarketer. The increase was helped by the popularity of services like buy online and pick up curbside. The pandemic has also forced some to shop online for the first time: online shopping among those 65 and older is expected to rise 12% this year.

— Good Times Restaurants, which runs Bad Daddy’s Burger Bar and Good Times Burgers & Frozen Custard, is reporting fiscal third-quarter same-store sales for Bad

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Popular Heartburn Drugs Linked to Heightened COVID-19 Risk

A popular form of heartburn medication may increase a person’s risk of developing COVID-19, according to a new study, lengthening the already long list of risk factors for the virus.

In the study, published Tuesday in pre-print form in the American Journal of Gastroenterology, scientists led by Cedars-Sinai Medical Center’s Dr. Brennan Spiegel conducted an online survey involving more than 86,000 people. Among them, more than 53,000 reported abdominal pain or discomfort, acid reflux, heartburn or regurgitation, and answered questions about the medications they took to relieve those symptoms. Of those, more than 3,300 tested positive for COVID-19.

When the researchers analyzed the data, they found that respondents who said they used proton pump inhibitor (PPI) medications to treat their heartburn had anywhere from two to four times the risk of testing positive for COVID-19, compared to people not using such medications. PPI drugs, which are available by prescription and

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After COVID-19, China moves to kick its exotic meat habit

Ou Yang is having a hard time finding snake to eat.

“A very famous restaurant specialized in cooking snakes in my city already stopped providing such dishes,” Ou told NBC News from Foshan, in southern China, where snake has long been regarded as a delicacy. “They are all banned now.”

As the world struggles to contain the coronavirus pandemic, China is clamping down on the sale of wildlife for human consumption amid concerns about another outbreak of a zoonotic disease. What began as a temporary ban to mitigate the spread of COVID-19 is making legislative leaps to a broader ban on the practice — a move international public health and wildlife experts have been urging for years.

While it means Ou will have to forgo his dinners of snakes, crocodiles, boars and bamboo rats, he understands the reasoning.

“I think the ban is helpful to maintain public health safety,” he

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Colleges race to create ‘a new sense of normalcy.’ Will new rules, COVID-19 testing be enough?

SAN DIEGO – When students arrive at the University of California-San Diego in August, they will find coronavirus testing stations strategically planted throughout campus.

To determine whether they’ve been infected, they’ll take a swab, dab it with nasal slime and leave the sample in a collection box. Bar codes with the packets will be linked to their personal medical records and cellphone numbers.

Within a day, students can expect results via text message. For those who test positive, a huge response system includes medical care, isolation and contact tracing.

Robert Schooley, chief of the infectious diseases division at UC San Diego Health, said the reopening plan, dubbed Return to Learn, has multiple scenarios for campus life, and surveillance results will dictate which one administrators deploy. Researchers will even pull manhole covers to check campus sewage for coronavirus levels.

“We want to be able to adjust what we do to what

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Keeping COVID-19 outside of camps is a near impossible challenge

As summer camps across the country debated whether and how to operate during the coronavirus pandemic this spring, Kanakuk Kamps, a prominent network of Christian sports camps in Missouri, announced its five overnight camps would open to over 20,000 kids starting May 30.

“Our full-time summer staff of 1,600 qualified individuals including 100 registered nurses and 60 volunteer doctors are hired and sitting on ready,” Joe White, who runs the camp with his wife Debbie-Jo, told families. “We are planning on being open all summer.”

On their website the camp assured parents “We are focused on taking all reasonable measures to prevent the spread of COVID-19 in our Kamps.”

But now even cautious hopes that COVID-19 might be kept outside Kanakuk Kamps’ gates are already dashed. On July 1, parents were notified by email that one of the camps, known as K-2, was shutting down. The Stone County Health Department’

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