kids

The Cutest Face Masks For Kids They’ll Actually Want To Wear

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Rainbows, dinosaurs and tie-dye — there are lots of face masks for kids that they'll actually wear. (Photo: Westend61 via Getty Images)
Rainbows, dinosaurs and tie-dye — there are lots of face masks for kids that they’ll actually wear. (Photo: Westend61 via Getty Images)

After months of online classes, virtual playdates and board games, your kiddo might be hoping to get some sun now that the summer’s here and school’s out.

While little ones might not totally understand how everything’s just a little different nowadays, you’re probably looking to get back a bit of normalcy with the warm weather — like setting up the sprinkler, hanging a hammock or planning a picnic. 

If you’re going to be in the great outdoors more often this summer, it’s recommended you and the kiddos put on a mask that you can breathe in and keep on social distancing.

Wearing a mask is a matter of public

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If Schools Are Open This Fall, Certain Kids Should Be Given Priority For In-Person Attendance

At this point, no one knows for sure what will happen with school next year. There’s a lot of talking and planning, but I think most of us realize that safely returning the nation’s approximately 56 million schoolchildren to school, along with their teachers, is going to be an absolute (and very risky) shitshow.

First, there is the issue of whether returning to school is safe. The new AAP guidelines assure parents that children usually get mild cases of COVID-19, and because of this, they usually don’t transmit the virus as easily to others. As the AAP explains, “Although many questions remain, the preponderance of evidence indicates that children and adolescents are less likely to be symptomatic and less likely to have severe disease resulting from SARS-CoV-2.” 

But note the language they are using here — “less likely” does not mean not that certain kids won’t get very sick

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5 Upgrades for Safer, Healthier Kids’ Rooms and Nurseries

Photo credit: KatarzynaBialasiewicz - Getty Images
Photo credit: KatarzynaBialasiewicz – Getty Images

From House Beautiful

As technology gives cutting-edge innovations to improve our homes, it’s no surprise that the kids’ category is offering up new and improved products to care for our little ones, too. Whether you’re the sort of parent who’s super aware of your carbon footprint or you’re just looking to brush up on safety standards, here are five easy upgrades—from smarter paint choices to natural-fiber swaps—that will make your kids’ room a healthier place. Get ready to breathe easier—literally!

Paint on a Fresh Coat

If you haven’t already, paint your walls with zero-VOC, organic paint. Not only is it healthier, it can also speed up the decor process: less time waiting for fumes to dry means you can move in faster!

Older homes can leak fumes into the air long after the paint has dried, too. A 2018 study published in the Journal

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Kids Must Wear Masks In Playgrounds; Other Updates

HOBOKEN, NJ – After a recent period in which Hoboken had only one new coronavirus case in a week, Hoboken Mayor Ravi Bhalla said in a Tuesday night update that there had been six new cases in the previous three days. Two cases were reported Monday, two Sunday, and two Saturday.

Last week, there were 16 new cases.

The city of 53,000 people now has now had 598 people with confirmed cases and 30 deaths of residents due to the virus. The city has not had any new resident deaths from the virus since May 21.

In his update Tuesday evening, Bhalla recommended that residents spend the July 4 weekend only with household members.

(To see what’s happening for July 4 in our area, check out our guide, including an update on the Macy’s fireworks.)

“In other states, such as California, reports have indicated that gatherings during Memorial Day weekend

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An economist who collected coronavirus data from 841 childcare centers explains how parents should decide whether to send kids back to school

reopening schools
reopening schools

Getty

  • As cities start opening up, parents face the tough decision of whether to send children who’ve been stuck at home for months to daycare, or school. 

  • To help parents with that decision, Emily Oster, an economist, collected coronavirus data from childcare centers that have stayed open during the pandemic. 

  • The data pointed to low transmission rates among both children and staff.

  • Still, Oster acknowledged that the childcare decision is a personal one and that there are “no easy answers.”

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Since the pandemic hit, Emily Oster — an economist who’s authored two books on parenting and pregnancy— has been using available data to respond to families’ pressing concerns about the coronavirus. She’s touched on topics like how to safely visit grandparents and the risks the virus poses in pregnant women.

Lately, Oster’s received an outpouring of questions from parents about whether to

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New ‘pandemic potential’ found in China; Arizona delays opening of schools; kids sports march on

A new pandemic threat could be simmering in China while at home more states are tightening restrictions aimed at tamping down an alarming boom in coronavirus cases.

Arizona delayed the start for in-class learning for the 2020-21 school year. Oregon and Kansas are the latest states that will begin to require face masks in public.

“Modeling from the Oregon Health Authority shows that if we don’t take further action to reduce the spread of the disease, our hospitals could be overwhelmed by new COVID-19 cases and hospitalizations within weeks,” Oregon Gov. Kate Brown said. “The choices every single one of us make in the coming days matter.”

In New Jersey, Gov. Phil Murphy announced late Monday that the state would pause its planned reopening for indoor dining and banned smoking and drinking at Atlantic City casinos set to reopen this week.

And in China, researchers are concerned about a new

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Parents and kids hate online learning, but they could face more of it

In his suburban New Jersey home-turned-classroom this spring, parent Don Seaman quickly found himself in the role of household vice principal.

While his wife holed up in the bedroom to work each day, Seaman, a media and marketing professional, worked from the family room where he could supervise his children’s virtual learning. A similar scene played out in millions of American homes after schools shuttered and moved classes online to contain the coronavirus.

Now that the year’s over, Seaman has strong feelings about the experience: Despite the best efforts of teachers, virtual learning didn’t work. At least not uniformly, if his three children in elementary, middle and high school are any indication.

“The older kids were saying ‘This is hell,'” Seaman said. “My kids feel isolated, and they can’t keep up, and they’re struggling with it.”

But like it or not, remote instruction and virtual learning are likely to continue

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Parents and kids hate online classes. Going back to school likely will include more of it.

In his suburban New Jersey home-turned-classroom this spring, parent Don Seaman quickly found himself in the role of household vice principal.

While his wife holed up in the bedroom to work each day, Seaman, a media and marketing professional, worked from the family room where he could supervise his children’s virtual learning. A similar scene played out in millions of American homes after schools shuttered and moved classes online to contain the coronavirus.

Now that the year’s over, Seaman has strong feelings about the experience: Despite the best efforts of teachers, virtual learning didn’t work. At least not uniformly, if his three children in elementary, middle and high school are any indication.

“The older kids were saying, ‘This is hell,'” Seaman said. “My kids feel isolated, and they can’t keep up, and they’re struggling with it.”

But like it or not, remote instruction and virtual learning are likely to continue

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Inside One Mother’s Fight To Help Her Kids Get An Education During Coronavirus

(Photo: Illustration: Damon Dahlen/HuffPost; Photos: Terri Johnson/Getty)
(Photo: Illustration: Damon Dahlen/HuffPost; Photos: Terri Johnson/Getty)

This story about rural education was produced as part of the series Critical Condition: The Students the Pandemic Hit Hardest, reported by HuffPost and The Hechinger Report, a nonprofit, independent news organization focused on inequality and innovation in education.

Terri Johnson willed her body not to show signs of impatience. She had been sitting in the parking lot of a McDonald’s in Greenville, Mississippi, for more than an hour, so her oldest child, Kentiona, could connect to the building’s Wi-Fi, something they didn’t have at home. Johnson didn’t want her daughter to feel rushed. 

Kentiona, 16, was in the passenger seat using the car’s dashboard as a makeshift desk. Her high school had recently closed in response to the coronavirus pandemic and shifted to distance learning. Kentiona’s persuasive essay for her English class had brought them to the McDonald’s on that third Friday

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Why It Is Possible and Okay for Parents to Teach Their Own Kids

Click here to read the full article.

High school-educated, working-class parents aren’t capable of overseeing their own child’s education, a state lawmaker said last week.

New Hampshire state Sen. Jeanne Dietsch, D-Peterborough, made the comment at a committee hearing last Tuesday while promoting a bill that would stop the state Board of Education from creating a new way of allocating high school graduation credits.

“This idea of parental choice, that’s great if the parent is well-educated. There are some families that’s perfect for. But to make it available to everyone? No. I think you’re asking for a huge amount of trouble,” Dietsch said.

Dietsch’s remarks represent a growing trend among leftist politicians to belittle, even vilify, a parent’s role. The trend stems from an ideology that insists the nanny state is superior to parents.

Dietsch’s political commentary was a full-on attack on parental rights and education in America, with a

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