risk

High Risk for Coronavirus | Protect Yourself

Consumer Reports has no financial relationship with advertisers on this site.

As the COVID-19 pandemic continues unfolding around the globe, people who are at higher risk for severe disease need to take special care.

COVID-19 appears to cause mild to moderate symptoms in most people who are infected. And some people seem to have no apparent effects from the virus.

But the older you are, the greater your risk for hospitalization, admission to an intensive care unit, being placed on a ventilator, and death, according to new guidance from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. 

For instance, people in their 50s are at higher risk than those in their 40s, and those in their 60s and 70s are at greater risk than those in their 50s, the CDC says. People 85 and older are at the greatest risk. (In the U.S., about 8 in 10 deaths from COVID-19 are

Read More

How much coronavirus risk is there in common travel activities? We asked an expert

Travel in the middle of a global pandemic presents challenges, with each activity carrying its own level of risk for coronavirus.

Joseph Khabbaza, a pulmonary and critical care physician at the Cleveland Clinic, said some of the biggest questions he’s getting relate to travel activities. 

Khabbaza, who treats coronavirus patients, said the primary path of transmission is contacts with respiratory droplets produced by infected people. Face masks, physical distancing, frequent handwashing and cleaning and disinfecting of surfaces have become standard across the travel sector.  

“Every industry has interventions in place to make things safer,” he said.

The Cleveland Clinic has been helping United Airlines develop its coronavirus mitigation policies, including mandatory face masks, touchless kiosks and physical distancing.

“Companies are bringing in outside health experts,” Khabbaza said. “That can be a little bit reassuring.”

Khabbaza, who’s taking a 500-mile road trip with his family to Long Island, New York, offered

Read More

Public health experts ranked 36 American activities based on risk

As more and more states begin phases of reopening, many Americans are now wondering what is safe to do and what should still be avoided to prevent the spread of coronavirus.

“There’s a huge amount of variation from business to business, from area to area, in how much transmission risk there is for resuming economic activity,” Dr. Katherine Baicker, of the University of Chicago Harris School of Public Policy, told Yahoo Finance’s The Ticker.

An analysis by MLive chose 36 American activities and asked four public health experts in Michigan to evaluate the risk of coronavirus exposure for each one. The doctors factored in whether the activity is inside or outside, proximity to others, length of potential exposure, likelihood of compliance, and personal risk level. 

Bars and large music concerts are the riskiest settings right now. (Graphic: David Foster/Yahoo Finance)

The experts gave a score to each activity, with

Read More