Michael Bloomberg is giving $100 million to help graduates of historically Black med schools pay off their loans | US & World News

frank lampard

(CNN) — Former New York City Mayor Michael Bloomberg is donating $100 million to the nation’s four historically Black medical schools to help ease the student debt burden for the next generation of Black physicians.

The billionaire’s charity, Bloomberg Philanthropies, announced the donation on Thursday as part of Bloomberg’s Greenwood Initiative, which was created earlier this year to help address economic justice issues that have affected Black Americans since the abolition of slavery.

The funds will be distributed to Howard University’s College of Medicine in Washington, the Morehouse School of Medicine in Atlanta, Meharry Medical College in Nashville and the Charles R. Drew University of Medicine and Science in Los Angeles, according to Bloomberg Philanthropies.

The schools said they will use the donations to create scholarships of up to $100,000 for students currently enrolled and receiving financial aid. Students who graduated in the spring are not eligible to receive funds.

Read More

Doctor: If schools reopen for fall, likely to close by end of October

frank lampard

  • The fall semester is quickly approaching for numerous US school districts, but lawmakers, school board members, and parents are still debating how and whether schools should reopen during the coronavirus pandemic.
  • Matt Lambert, an emergency medicine physician and former chief medical information officer for New York City Health and Hospitals, told Business Insider that schools could reopen with strict health safety precautions but that the prevalence of the virus could challenge their ability to stay open.
  • Lambert said it could be difficult identifying and separating coronavirus cases and flu cases because of the similarity between symptoms and increased exposure to others.
  • “When the flu comes back around October, it’s going to create some challenges intermingling with the coronavirus, because patients don’t come in saying, ‘I have the coronavirus,’ or, ‘I have the flu’ — they come in saying, ‘I have a fever, a cough, or shortness of breath,'” he said.
Read More

Marshall School of Medicine 1 of 9 schools to offer Mission Act scholarships to veterans | News

frank lampard

HUNTINGTON — Marshall University Joan C. Edwards School of Medicine was selected as one of nine medical schools to offer a new scholarship for veterans pursuing a career in medicine.

The Veterans Affairs Mission Act of 2018 created several programs to assist veterans in paying for medical school through scholarships and loan repayments, including the Veterans Healing Veterans Medical Access and Scholarship Program (VHVMASP).

Beginning with the incoming class of students in 2020, Marshall University was selected to award up to two scholarships per year to qualifying veterans. To qualify for VHVMASP, applicants must have completed their military service no more than 10 years from the time of application. They cannot receive the GI Bill or Vocational Rehabilitation funding while receiving the scholarship.

The scholarship is renewable for up to four years and covers tuition, fees, equipment and books; a stipend; and costs for two rotations at a Veterans Affairs

Read More

Back to school? Despite CDC recommendations, most major schools going online as COVID-19 cases spike

frank lampard

As COVID-19 cases rise in most states, the prospect of in-person learning this fall at the country’s major school districts is becoming increasingly remote.

So far, nine of the top 15 school systems by enrollment plan to start the fall semester online, with two more currently planning a hybrid of in-person and online classes, according to Education Week magazine’s reopening tracker. Other top districts shifted school schedules later, hoping for cases to decline or for teachers and administrators to have more time to plan for the school year. 

As back-to-school season approaches, it’s highly likely the majority of big districts will start learning remotely while they work out plans for socially distant reopenings, said Annette Anderson, deputy director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Safe and Healthy Schools.

The biggest factor: whether the community where the school is located is seeing infection rates decrease, said Kristi Wilson, superintendent of the

Read More

CDC COVID-19 advice tells schools to wash hands, wear masks, don’t touch. But not when to close

frank lampard

School districts across California continue to debate how and when to reopen — if they should at all.
School districts across California continue to debate how and when to reopen — if they should at all.

Parent check-list for back-to-school: Label your child’s face mask with permanent marker. Have them practice putting on and taking off their mask without touching the cloth. Make a labeled, resealable plastic bag to store their mask for during lunch time. 

Those are among the suggestions the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has for school administrators and parents as families prepare for school to resume in the fall.

Students should wear masks, wash their hands frequently and socially distance to protect against COVID-19 as schools reopen this fall, CDC urged in new guidance documents to administrators published Thursday.

“It is critically important for our public health to open schools this fall,” said CDC Director Dr. Robert Redfield in a release.

“I know this has been a difficult time for our Nation’s families.

Read More

What Other Countries Can Teach The U.S. About Safely Reopening Schools

frank lampard

One of the many challenges of reopening classrooms in the United States is that there isn’t much good data, if any, about what could happen. Will in-person learning lead to a jump in the transmission of COVID-19? Will students and teachers get sick? How many? How sick?

There is so much that health officials, teachers, parents and kids will simply be forced to learn in real time. And what works in another population, in another country, may be very different from what works in this population, here. 

“There are so many different ways in which schools have reopened around the world, and it’s hard to put in a capsule to say ‘This is the best way’ or ‘This is potentially something we can replicate,’” said Dr. Ibukun Akinboyo, an assistant professor in the pediatrics department at Duke University School of Medicine.

Yet there is something to be gained by looking

Read More

Open schools for younger kids, top pediatrician says

frank lampard

Kindergarten teacher Holly Rupprecht carries plexiglass panels to her room at Zion Lutheran School in Bethalto, Ill., on Monday. (Robert Cohen/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)
Kindergarten teacher Holly Rupprecht carries plexiglass panels to her room at Zion Lutheran School in Bethalto, Ill., on Monday. (Robert Cohen/St. Louis Post-Dispatch via AP)

WASHINGTON — Younger children pose a smaller risk of catching and transmitting the coronavirus, a top pediatrician told Congress on Thursday, providing a scientific argument for why elementary schools could potentially open in parts of the country next month.

“School systems may consider prioritizing the return of younger children and taking additional measures to ensure physical distancing and the wearing of face coverings among older children,” Dr. Sean O’Leary told the House Education and Labor Subcommittee on Early Childhood, Elementary, and Secondary Education on Thursday morning. 

The hearing was titled “Underfunded & Unprepared,” a sign of how House Democrats, who control the chamber’s agenda, view the matter. 

O’Leary, a vice chair for infectious disease at the American Academy of Pediatrics, also cited a South Korean

Read More

Back to school? Most major schools are heading toward online class as COVID-19 cases spike

frank lampard

As COVID-19 cases rise in most states, the prospect of in-person learning this fall at the country’s major school districts is becoming increasingly remote.

As of late Wednesday, 11 of the top 15 school systems by enrollment were already either planning to start the fall semester online or in a hybrid of in-person and online classes, according to Education Week magazine’s reopening tracker. Still other top districts have shifted school schedules later, hoping for cases to decline or for teachers and administrators to have more time to plan for the school year. 

As back-to-school season approaches, it’s highly likely the majority of big districts will start learning remotely while they work out plans for socially distant reopenings, said Annette Anderson, deputy director of the Johns Hopkins Center for Safe and Healthy Schools.

The biggest factor: whether the community where the school is located is seeing infection rates decrease, said Kristi

Read More

Denver Public Schools Offer New Details On Virtual Learning

frank lampard

DENVER—Denver Public School officials are preparing for three learning scenarios that will likely vary throughout the school year as health conditions and guidance change as a result of the coronavirus.

The upcoming fall semester will start off with fully remote learning, with the hope of offering in-person learning to families in early September, according to district officials.

“We are preparing for a school year that will offer a fully virtual learning option for families who want it, in addition to as much in-person learning as conditions allow, based on the guidance of our health partners,” school officials said in a letter to parents.

Virtual Learning: What To Expect

District officials said students taking part in a fully online program will be assigned teachers from their school. In some cases, however, virtual program students will be assigned to a class with a DPS teacher from a different school in their community,

Read More

Central Florida schools push learning option that lets them can keep student funding

frank lampard

Central Florida public school districts are giving parents choices on how their children learn this fall, and many schools are pushing programs that would keep students in their home district.

The reason? Money. Public schools receive full funding for students who take classes on campus or through their own online learning model, but lose out on funds for kids enrolled in the Florida Virtual School — which could mean teacher layoffs.

Principals in Orange County have sent messages to parents through phone calls and social media posts expressing funding concerns and “highly recommending” the district’s new virtual program, OCPS LaunchED@Home, over the other virtual school option.

West Orange High School principal Matt Turner wrote in a newsletter to parents that he was “lobbying heavily” for families to pick on-campus learning if they’re comfortable or LaunchED@Home, which will have live, online lessons that follow a traditional school schedule.

“I just wanted

Read More