states

More states close bars, slow reopening plans; Gilead Sciences sets price for remdesivir treatments

More states were slowing reopening plans Monday amid a national boom in coronavirus cases, although one Arizona mayor is unmoved by the ominous trend in his state.

And a drug company has set a steep price for remdesivir, a drug that has proven to shorten recovery times by about 31% for severe COVID-19 patients.

Nashville, Tennessee, will require masks starting Monday. California Gov. Gavin Newsom ordered bars in eight counties to close Sunday, days after governors in Florida and Texas issued similar, wide-ranging edicts. San Francisco Mayor London Breed halted its plans for businesses that were scheduled to reopen Monday. The state of Washington paused its fourth and final reopening phase. 

In Arizona, the number of confirmed cases increased by more than 3,850 on Sunday. Meanwhile, the mayor of a town in an eastern part of the state said that he has no plans to cancel a slew of upcoming

Read More

Where 23 states stand on NFL, coronavirus measures

It’s that time of year when NFL teams should be heading into their final month of operations before wrapping the offseason with a full squad veteran minicamp in mid-June. Instead, the league’s power brokers are still trying to figure out when franchises across the country will be allowed to resume their operations — and if there is any hope of training camps or the regular season starting on time.

Murphy said on Tuesday that professional sports may resume practices and actual games in the state as soon as leagues allow teams to do so. On Wednesday, Pennsylvania Gov. Tom Wolf announced that his state will allow practices and games without spectators as long as the leagues have a safety plan approved by the Pennsylvania Department of Health once the state enters the “yellow” and “green” phases.

Newsom took a strong lockdown approach in early March to combat the COVID-19 pandemic. … Read More

News from around our 50 states

Alabama

Montgomery: Alabama and much of the Deep South are seeing a spike in coronavirus cases as some have stopped heeding warnings of the disease, alarming public health officials and people who have lost loved ones because of COVID-19. Over the past two weeks, Alabama had the second-highest number of new cases per capita in the nation. South Carolina was fourth. Louisiana and Mississippi were also in the top 10. “We are extremely concerned about these numbers. We know if they continue, we will see more hospitalizations and more deaths,” Alabama State Health Officer Scott Harris said. The combination of preexisting health conditions and limited health care access in the region, along with pockets of public skepticism about health officials’ advice on the illness, complicate attempts to manage the virus. Dr. Selwyn Vickers, dean of the UAB School of Medicine, said the South has high rates of diabetes, kidney disease,

Read More

With the Federal Health Megaphone Silent, States Struggle With a Shifting Pandemic

A restaurant in Austin, Tex., on Wednesday, June 17, 2020. (Ilana Panich-Linsman/The New York Times).
A restaurant in Austin, Tex., on Wednesday, June 17, 2020. (Ilana Panich-Linsman/The New York Times).

WASHINGTON — The federal government’s leadership in the coronavirus crisis has so faded that state and local health officials have been left to figure out on their own how to handle rising infections and to navigate conflicting signals from the White House.

About 800 Americans a day are still dying of COVID-19, a pace that, if sustained over the next few months, would yield more than 200,000 dead by the end of September. Arizona, Florida, Nevada, Oregon and Texas all reported their largest one-day increases in new cases on Tuesday.

On Wednesday, Oklahoma recorded 259 new cases, a single-day record for the second day in a row, and just three days before President Donald Trump is scheduled to hold an indoor campaign rally in Tulsa in defiance of his own administration’s guidelines for “phased reopening.”

Read More

Alarming rise in confirmed cases in U.S. states spared from first outbreaks

While coronavirus cases in the former epicenter of New York have been steadily decreasing over the past few weeks, new cases are popping up in other areas of the U.S.

States like Texas, California, Arizona, Arkansas, Mississippi, Utah, North Carolina, and South Carolina are seeing increased rates of positive COVID-19 tests. Many of these are being attributed to Memorial Day weekend activities, in which many crowds assembled throughout that weekend, potentially exposing themselves.

Coronavirus cases are declining in New York but remaining steadfast in the rest of the U.S. (Graphic: David Foster/Yahoo Finance)

“In many parts of the country, there was minimal exposure,” Dr. David Katz, a specialist in preventative medicine and president of Public Health and True Health Initiative, said on Yahoo Finance’s The Ticker. “People followed the rules, sheltered in place, socially distanced. And now there’s sort of a haphazard return to the world without a lot

Read More