Does obesity make the virus more dangerous?

frank lampard

Getty Images
Getty Images

Following his admittance to intensive care with coronavirus in April, prime minister Boris Johnson is reportedly preparing a more “interventionist” drive to tackle UK obesity in the ongoing and long-term fight against Covid-19.

On 24 July, it was reported that the prime minister will set out new measures next week, which are expected to include a ban on TV junk food adverts before 9pm.

They are also likely to include a ban on online ads for unhealthy foods and limits on in-store promotions. Some restaurants could be required to put calorie labels on menus.

Mr Johnson is convinced his Covid-condition became more serious because of his weight – said to be 17.5 stone at the time he was taken to hospital, according to a separate report on 15 May.

This is not the most time the severity of coronavirus has been linked to a patient’s weight – when

Read More

Donald Trump cancels Republican convention speech over virus fears

frank lampard

Donald Trump admitted that his speech would be risky because of the outbreak - REUTERS
Donald Trump admitted that his speech would be risky because of the outbreak – REUTERS

Donald Trump has cancelled his Republican convention speech in Florida because of the coronavirus outbreak there, saying he did not want to “take any chances”.

The US president had moved his speech to the state from North Carolina, claiming the governor there would not let him hold one with a big crowd, but now has cancelled that plan.

Mr Trump said he will still do a speech formally accepting his party’s nomination but that the details had not yet been worked out, suggesting it was possible it could be online only.

“I’ll still do a convention speech in a different form but we won’t do a big, crowded convention per se. It’s just not the right time for that,” Mr Trump said.

Follow the latest updates below.

04:12 AM

Brazil study finds no hydroxychloroquine benefit

Read More

Nancy Pelosi Calls Out ‘the Trump Virus’ as Trump Continues to Call COVID-19 the ‘China Virus’

frank lampard

As President Donald Trump continues to refer to the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) as “the China virus” — despite widespread backlash — House Speaker Nancy Pelosi this week flipped it around in an attack of her own.

In a Tuesday interview with CNN’s Wolf Blitzer, Pelosi reacted to Trump’s latest coronavirus briefing at the White House and argued that, despite his more somber tone earlier in the day, he had exacerbated the pandemic in the U.S.

“If he had said months ago ‘Let’s wear a mask, let’s socially distance’ instead of having rallies and political-whatever-they-were, then more people would have followed his lead as the president of the United States, instead of being a bad example making it like a manhood thing not to wear a mask,” she said.

“A briefing on the coronavirus should be about science and that is something the president has ignored,” Pelosi, 80, added. “So I

Read More

U.S. Cases Rise 2%; California Shuts Indoor Dining: Virus Update

frank lampard

(Bloomberg) —

California closed indoor dining and bars, and its two biggest school districts said they would offer remote learning only despite calls by the Trump administration for classrooms to fully reopen. The state reported a record number of people hospitalized with coronavirus.

New York City will redouble efforts to educate young people about the importance of wearing masks and keeping socially distant after an increase in cases among those ages 20 to 29.

Hong Kong reported 41 new local cases, another record high, and tightened social-distancing measures amid fears of a resurgence after weeks of near-normal activity. More than half a million residents defied the fresh outbreak and government warnings to vote in an unofficial primary.

Key Developments:

Global Tracker: Cases top 12.9 million; deaths surpass 570,000New York school reopenings will hinge on regional infection ratesCoronavirus surge is officially slowing the U.S. recoveryDeath rate in majority-Black counties is getting

Read More

We won’t immediately have a ‘perfect vaccine,’ and it is ‘not realistic’ to expect the virus will soon be eliminated

frank lampard

President Donald Trump wears a mask as he walks down the hallway during his visit to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Saturday, July 11, 2020.
President Donald Trump wears a mask as he walks down the hallway during his visit to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Saturday, July 11, 2020.

Associated Press/Patrick Semansky

  • The World Health Organization warned Monday that any coronavirus vaccine will likely not be “perfect,” in part because not “everyone will have access” to it right away.

  • The WHO stressed that other time-tested public health measures: handwashing, social distancing, quarantining, and wearing masks in public, can all help tamp down the spread of the virus in the meantime.

  • “Turn and face the problem and accept that it’s going to take time,” the WHO’s Mike Ryan said. “It’s going to require a huge commitment on the part of government and individuals in a number of countries to turn this around.” 

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A coronavirus vaccine is still many months away, but leading infectious disease

Read More

Virus spread, not politics should guide schools, doctors say

frank lampard

As the Trump administration pushes full steam ahead to force schools to resume in-person education, public health experts warn that a one-size-fits-all reopening could drive infection and death rates even higher.

They’re urging a more cautious approach, which many local governments and school districts are already pursuing.

But U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos doubled down on President Donald Trump’s insistence that kids can safely return to the classroom.

“There’s nothing in the data that suggests that kids being in school is in any way dangerous,” she told Chris Wallace on “Fox News Sunday.”

Still, heath experts say there are too many uncertainties and variables for back-to-school to be back-to-normal.

Where is the virus spreading rapidly? Do students live with aged grandparents? Do teachers have high-risk health conditions that would make online teaching safest? Do infected children easily spread COVID-19 to each other and to adults?

Regarding the latter, some evidence

Read More

Push to Reopen U.S. Schools; New York Cases Steady: Virus Update

frank lampard

(Bloomberg) —

U.S. Education Secretary Betsy DeVos said “the rule should be that kids go back to school this fall,” despite rising cases around the country. New York reported 677 new cases, in line with daily rises in the last week, and five deaths.

South Africa may reintroduce tighter regulations on the movement of people and curb sales of alcohol as coronavirus infections soar, the Sunday Times reported. Hungary is also restricting travel after spikes in neighboring countries. Infections in Germany increased by 377.

Thailand plans to start human trials for a locally developed, potential Covid-19 vaccine as early as September, making it among the first done outside high-income countries, after encouraging results in monkeys and mice.

Infections in Germany increased by 377.

Key Developments:

Global Tracker: Cases top 12.7 million; deaths surpass 565,000Aversion to mask-wearing holds back U.S. economyU.K. set to tighten rules on wearing face masksWall Street forges

Read More

Australia deals with virus spike; Serbia erupts in violence

frank lampard

BELGRADE, Serbia (AP) — The reimposition of coronavirus lockdown measures in Serbia touched off violent clashes in the capital Belgrade that left at least 60 police and protesters hurt amid renewed warnings that the virus is still gathering pace.

Australia grappled with a COVID-19 spike in the city of Melbourne that prepared on Wednesday for a second lockdown to contain the virus’ spread. Melbourne’s virus woes contrasted sharply with other areas of the country that have been reporting low or no daily infections.

Africa surpassed the half million mark of coronavirus infections according to figures released Wednesday by the Africa Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. South Africa reported another day of more than 10,000 confirmed cases.

There’s no way to know the real number of confirmed virus cases among Africa’s 1.3 billion people as its 54 countries continue to face a serious shortage of testing materials for the virus.

Read More

Virus, Floyd death merge in brutal blow to Black well-being

frank lampard

Doctors have known it for a long time, well before the resounding cries of “Black Lives Matter”: Black people suffer disproportionately.

They face countless challenges to good health, among them food, transportation and income. The stress of living with racism has very real, physical effects. And they are especially prone to diabetes, hypertension and other chronic diseases that can be tricky to manage even in normal times.

Then came COVID-19 and George Floyd — one killing Black people in alarming numbers, the other shining a harsh light on systemic racism. In a matter of months and nearly 8 minutes, it became clear that institutions designed to ensure the two most important things in life — health and safety — had converged to turn against one segment of the population in stark, horrific ways.

It’s a brutal blow to Black people’s well-being and renewed calls for racial justice in all realms

Read More

Virus Surges in Arizona, but the Rodeo Goes on

frank lampard

Testing for the coronavirus at a drive-thru testing site in Phoenix, Ariz., on Saturday, June 27, 2020. (Adriana Zehbrauskas/The New York Times)
Testing for the coronavirus at a drive-thru testing site in Phoenix, Ariz., on Saturday, June 27, 2020. (Adriana Zehbrauskas/The New York Times)

PHOENIX — As infections surged through Arizona’s desert landscape this week, word spread that the Round Valley Rodeo, a century-old tradition luring calf ropers, youth riders and big crowds to the mountain town of Springerville, might be called off. The fate of the Fourth of July parade in the nearby hamlet of Eagar seemed in doubt, too, as Gov. Doug Ducey prepared to issue new pandemic guidance.

But Ducey stopped short of ordering a halt to such events, and as of Friday, he had not required Arizonans to wear face coverings in public spaces, as Texas did Thursday. The rodeo and parade will march ahead Saturday as planned, even as infections in the state spiral.

Such is the way fiercely independent Arizona has handled the virus from the

Read More