The Gen Z founders of a boutique skincare brand tackling chronic skin conditions and stigma

This is an installment in a special series, Startup Year One, interviewing startup founders about the major lessons they learned in the immediate aftermath of their businesses’ first year of operation.



a person posing for the camera: Olamide Olowe co-founder of Topicals.


© Courtesy of Topicals
Olamide Olowe co-founder of Topicals.

At 23-years-old, Olamide Olowe is purported to be the youngest Black woman to raise over $2 million in venture capital funding ($2.6 million to be exact). This year, she and cofounder Claudia Teng founded Topicals, a skincare brand with high-end beauty products intended to treat sensitive skin conditions at lesser price points.

As two young women of color, Olowe and Teng said they grew up settling for products that didn’t really serve them or represent their skin. With Topicals, they want to create an inclusive community around positive and authentic discussions about their skin.  And as chronic skin conditions often lead to serious mental health issues as a result of

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Anthony Fauci receives Lienhard Award from National Academy of Medicine

WASHINGTON — For his role as a leader of federal research and policy on infectious diseases and, in particular, for his deft, scientifically grounded leadership in shaping an effective response to the COVID-19 pandemic, the National Academy of Medicine today announced Anthony S. Fauci is the recipient of the 2020 Gustav O. Lienhard Award for Advancement of Health Care. The award will be presented at the National Academy of Medicine’s virtual annual meeting on Oct. 19. Fauci is the director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID), part of the National Institutes of Health, and has served in that position since 1984.

At NIAID, Fauci oversees an extensive portfolio of basic and applied research to prevent, diagnose, and treat infectious diseases such as HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria, as well as emerging and re-emerging diseases such as Ebola and Zika. During his career at NIAID, he has advised

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Apple rolls out virtual fitness service, subscription bundle, catering to pandemic work-from-home



Tim Cook looking at the camera: Apple special event at the company's headquarters in Cupertino


© Reuters/APPLE INC
Apple special event at the company’s headquarters in Cupertino

By Stephen Nellis

(Reuters) – Apple Inc rolled out a new virtual fitness service and a bundle of all its subscriptions, Apple One, focusing a holiday-season product launch on services that are the backbone of Apple’s growth strategy and that cater to customers working at home during the COVID-19 pandemic.


Béatrice Nerson posing for the camera: Apple special event at the company's headquarters in Cupertino


© Reuters/APPLE INC
Apple special event at the company’s headquarters in Cupertino

Apple also introduced a new Apple Watch Series 6 that monitors blood oxygen and will cost $399 and a more basic Apple Watch SE for $279.



a person holding a cell phone: Apple special event at the company's headquarters in Cupertino


© Reuters/APPLE INC
Apple special event at the company’s headquarters in Cupertino

But the bevy of incremental updates to existing hardware and subscription price tinkering disappointed investors, with Apple shares closing up 0.2%.

The Apple One bundle will cost $15 per month for an individual plan or $20 per month

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Polymers prevent potentially hazardous mist during dentist visit

Polymers prevent potentially hazardous mist during dentist visit
Using polyacrylic acid solution in water as irrigation fluid in dentistry reduces risk of aerosolized pathogens. Here, the polymer is shown forming snakelike threads near the tip of a vibrating cavitron scaler (top), and it forms spools near the tip of a turbine-driven dental drill. In both cases, aerosolization is completely eliminated. Credit: Images created by Jevon Plog.

Researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago couldn’t stop thinking about the spinning, vibrating tools in a dentist’s office that turn water into mist and send it flying into the air. If that mist contains a virus or some other pathogen, it is a health hazard for dentists and patients.


In a paper published this week in Physics of Fluids, Alexander Yarin and his colleagues discovered that the forces of a vibrating tool or dentist’s drill are no match for the viscoelastic properties of food-grade polymers, such as polyacrylic acid,

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DWD will not ask recipients to repay $300 unemployment supplement

The Federal Emergency Management Agency, which funds the program, notified DWD Friday, Sept. 11, that federal guidance requesting the money be paid back is unlikely.

The benefit, created by the Trump administration under the Lost Wage Assistance program, supplements weekly unemployment benefits by $300 a week for six weeks in Wisconsin.

The clarification from DWD comes after the department asked unemployment recipients to acknowledge that they could have to pay the money back, a possibility that confused many and may have caused some to incorrectly make themselves ineligible for the extra money, according to interviews with unemployment insurance recipients and numerous posts in Wisconsin unemployment insurance Facebook support groups.

The question, which is one of the factors that determines whether someone is eligible to receive the $300 supplement, asks unemployment recipients to certify that they are partially or completely unemployed because of disruptions related to COVID-19. Many receive the question

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