Dry skin amid the coronavirus pandemic, winter: Tips to avoid making it worse

Hand washing is an expert-recommended way to stave off a COVID-19 infection, but it can lead to dry, cracked skin. Even more, winter is on the way, bringing with it cold, dry weather that is notoriously hard on the skin. 

Fox News spoke to Dr. Latanya Benjamin, a Society for Pediatric Dermatology executive committee member, to learn why winter is so harsh on the skin and what you can do about it.

Read on for a look at what she had to say.

Hand washing is an expert-recommended way to stave off a COVID-19 infection, but it can lead to dry, cracked skin. Even more, winter is on the way, bringing with it cold, dry weather that is notoriously hard on the skin.

Hand washing is an expert-recommended way to stave off a COVID-19 infection, but it can lead to dry, cracked skin. Even more, winter is on the way, bringing with it cold, dry weather that is notoriously hard on the skin.
(iStock)

Fox News: Why is winter weather so harsh on the skin?

Benjamin: At this time of year and heading into the winter months, dry, cold

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Thinking about making a dentist appointment? What you need to know

Thinking about scheduling a dentist appointment? The World Health Organization encourages a remote consultation first, and that any routine non-essential care (like checkups or cleanings) be delayed until there is a sufficient reduction in COVID-19 transmission rates.

Though if rates are low in your area and you’re overdue for an appointment, reach out to your dentist to discuss. According to Dr. Chad Gehani, the president of the American Dental Association (ADA), dental health is “vital to overall health.” Though it’s important to note that a visit may look a little different these days.

“Many times people do not comprehend that teeth are attached to the body, to the bone and head, and that it is as important to take care of their teeth as their organs,” he said. “Most of the dental diseases are preventable and, if detected in an early stage, they are very inexpensive and they are very

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Online school? In-person? How parents are making their own fall 2020 decisions as COVID-19 squabbles continue

As officials play political football with K-12 school re-openings, parents such as Johanne Davis are formulating their own game plans for the fall.

“To exercise an abundance of caution, I’d like to keep my kids home with me where they’ll study online,” says Davis, a mother of three from Indian Land, South Carolina, one of countless states where COVID-19 cases have spiked in recent weeks.

“Health is the issue, not just for my children, but also school workers,” says Davis. “Teachers shouldn’t have to be frontline soldiers in this pandemic.”

Families across the nation are busy making their own calculations about whether to send children back to school. While Davis seems resolved, many parents are still mulling.

Johanne Davis, left, in a photo with her three children. Davis and her husband say they're both fortunate enough to work from home and can manage the children if they have to spend a lot of next year studying remotely. But she acknowledges that hers is a privileged position not afforded to lower-income parents grappling with child care in order to go off to work.
Johanne Davis, left, in a photo with her three children. Davis and her husband say they’re both fortunate enough to work from home and can manage the children if they have to spend
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The Trump campaign is making Tulsa rally-goers sign a waiver saying they won’t sue if they get the coronavirus but won’t say whether event staff will have to do the same

President Donald Trump addressing a campaign rally on October 10, 2019, in Minneapolis.
President Donald Trump addressing a campaign rally on October 10, 2019, in Minneapolis.

AP Photo/Jim Mone

  • President Donald Trump is scheduled to take the stage at the BOK Center in Tulsa, Oklahoma, on Saturday night for his first campaign rally since the coronavirus pandemic shut down most of the US.

  • To sign up for the rally online, prospective attendees must accept a warning about the novel coronavirus that absolves the Trump campaign and the venue of responsibility for “illness or injury.”

  • A spokeswoman for the BOK Center didn’t say whether employees would sign such a waiver and wouldn’t give further information on which precautions were being taken to prevent the spread among event staff members and security.

  • She couldn’t say how many employees would work the event but told Business Insider that vendors and concession stands would be open Saturday.

  • On Wednesday, the state of Oklahoma reported its highest single-day

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