The Army is rolling out a new fitness test: Will it hold back women?

That reflects a significant improvement over last year, when leaked data showed that over 80 percent of a smaller cohort of female test-takers failed the six-event exam. But some women fear they won’t be able to pass even with additional training or will continue to score lower than men, potentially affecting their career prospects in an institution already struggling to shed historical gender and racial disparities.

The test, which will become the service’s official fitness test next month, has prompted a broader debate over whether the service’s focus on fitness and strength will elevate physical prowess over other qualities, such as effective and ethical leadership, or make it harder to retain troops with skills needed in an era of high-tech military competition.

Army officials say the new age- and gender-blind fitness test, the first of its kind in the U.S. military, was developed to reduce injuries and better prepare soldiers

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MattDoesFitness Tries the Pacer Fitness Test Without Training

British bodybuilder and YouTuber Matt Morsia, a.k.a. MattDoesFitness is game to try any type of fitness challenge. He’s already taken on the British Army Fitness Test, the Russian Army Fitness Test, and the U.S. Air Force’s Physical Fitness Test (PFT) . For his latest challenge, he’s taking on the PACER fitness test, along with his brother Ben.

You might be familiar with the test as the beep test, or the multi-stage fitness test. “There are multiple names for it, but there is one universal description: it f*cking sucks,” Morsia says.

PACER stands for Progressive Aerobic Cardiovascular Endurance Run, and the test is used to gauge aerobic capacity for everyone from elementary schoolers to pro athletes. During the test, you run 20 meter shuttles back and forth, trying to get to the other side before you hear a ‘beep’. The beeps get faster and faster—and once you can’t complete the shuttle

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Global trial to test whether MMR vaccine protects front-line health-care workers against COVID-19

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Vaccine may strengthen immune response to viral infections; trial to enroll up to 30,000 health-care workers

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An international research network of physicians and scientists is launching a clinical trial to evaluate whether the vaccine for measles, mumps and rubella (MMR) can protect front-line health-care workers against infection from SARS-CoV-2, the virus that causes COVID-19. The trial aims to enroll up to 30,000 health-care workers globally.

Washington University School of Medicine in St. Louis is the clinical coordinating center for this ambitious, international trial, which is the first to evaluate on a large scale whether the MMR vaccine can protect against COVID-19. The trial is co-led by Washington University, University College London

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Researchers test antibody drug as treatment for COVID-19 | News Center

Stanford Medicine researchers are investigating whether a combination of specific antibodies can reduce early symptoms of COVID-19 in people with mild to moderate cases of the disease.

Their effort is part of a multisite clinical trial of an antibody drug developed by Eli Lilly and AbCellera that aims to enroll 550 participants at hospitals and medical centers nationwide. 

Andra Blomkalns, MD, principal investigator of the Stanford trial site, said she hopes to enroll 20 to 40 participants who have tested positive for COVID-19 at Stanford Health Care’s Marc and Laura Andreessen Emergency Department. 

“The goal is to see if we can get sick people better faster, reducing both the length of their illness and how long they are shedding the virus, and therefore help prevent others from getting sick,” said Blomkalns, professor and chair of emergency medicine. “I think this treatment shows great promise.”

It’s a Phase II trial, which

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Bolsonaro has 3rd test to see if still infected

BRASILIA, Brazil — Brazilian President Jair Bolsonaro says he has had a third test to see if he is still infected with the coronavirus and that the result will be released Wednesday.

Speaking to supporters gathered in front of the presidential residence Tuesday, Bolsonaro said, “God willing, I will test negative.”

The president announced on July 7 that he had COVID-19, the disease that can be caused by the virus. On July 15, he said he had tested positive one more time.

Bolsonaro says that if his latest test proves negative, he wants to travel Friday to the state of Piauí in northeastern Brazil. The head of Brazil’s Ministry of Regional Development is scheduled to visit the city of Floriano in that state to dedicate new housing and a sanitation system.

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We’ll need enormous numbers of Americans to test COVID-19 vaccines; a ‘very encouraging’ 138,600 have signed up

At a time when some Americans are concerned about the safety of a COVID-19 vaccine, tens of thousands have already volunteered to help bring one into existence.

As of Monday , more than 138,600 people had signed up to take part in testing.

“That’s why we’re optimistic that we’re going to be able to get the trials enrolled in an expeditious way. I think we can do what we need to do,” said Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

The milestone was reached just a week after the National Institutes of Health launched a clinical trial network for vaccines and other prevention tools to fight the pandemic.

More are still needed, but the initial surge will go a long way toward filling the requirement for at least 30,000 volunteers each for the four companies that plan to launch Phase 3 clinical trials of

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Army Combat Fitness Test

The SDC is a test of strength, endurance, and anaerobic capacity, which are needed to accomplish high intensity combat tasks that last from a few seconds to several minutes.

Starting position
On the command “GET SET,” one Soldier in each lane will assume the prone position with the top of the head behind the start line. The grader is positioned to see both the start line and the 25m line. The grader can position a Soldier/battle buddy on the 25m line to ensure compliance with test event standards.

Sprint
On the command “GO,” Soldiers stand and sprint 25m; touch the 25m line with foot and hand; turn and sprint back to the start line. If the Soldier fails to touch the 25m line with hand and foot, the grader watching the 25m turn line will call them back.

Drag
Soldiers will grasp each strap handle, which will be positioned and

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At least 120,000 Americans are needed to test COVID-19 vaccines; a ‘very encouraging’ 107,000 have signed up

At a time when some Americans are concerned about the safety of a COVID-19 vaccine, tens of thousands have already volunteered to help bring one into existence.

As of last week, more than 107,000 people had signed up to take part in testing.

“That’s why we’re optimistic that we’re going to be able to get the trials enrolled in an expeditious way. I think we can do what we need to do,” said Dr. Anthony Fauci, director of the National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases.

The milestone was reached just a week after the National Institutes of Health launched a clinical trial network for vaccines and other prevention tools to fight the pandemic.

More are still needed, but the initial surge will go a long way toward filling the requirement for at least 30,000 volunteers each for the four companies that plan to launch Phase 3 clinical trials of

Read More

5 Reasons to Get an HIV Test Today

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Everyone between the ages of 13 and 64 should be tested for HIV at least once in their lifetime, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Despite the CDC’s sweeping recommendation, fewer than 40 percent of adults in the U.S. have ever gotten an HIV test, according to a study published last year. And even though HIV testing is becoming more common in emergency rooms and community health centers, there has been no increase in testing at doctors’ offices, the CDC reported in a June 26 study. 

In the midst of the COVID-19 crisis, HIV may not be top of mind. But “HIV and sexual health services are always needed,” says Omi Singh, M.P.H., the director of testing at GMHC, an HIV care and advocacy nonprofit. “The current pandemic has not stopped that.”

HIV, the virus

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Where can I buy an at-home coronavirus test and how much does one cost?

As coronavirus testing has ramped up across the country, some companies have made it possible for the average American to adminster a test from the comfort of their own home.

At home tests are approved by the Food and Drug Administration and are performed either by nasal swab or saliva collection.

Below are some of the companies who offer at-home coronavirus tests and how much each one costs:

SECOND CORONAVIRUS LOCKDOWN NOT NEEDED IN STATES WITH SPIKING CASE NUMBERS: DR. INGLESBY

Pixel by LabCorp

Pixel by LabCorp offers an at-home coronavirus test kit for $119, but those who are eligible may be able to get it at no upfront cost either through their insurance plan or through funding from the federal government.

To order a test kit, customers are asked to take an online survey which will ask you questions on symptoms you are feeling related to COVID-19. The test 

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