Dry skin amid the coronavirus pandemic, winter: Tips to avoid making it worse

Hand washing is an expert-recommended way to stave off a COVID-19 infection, but it can lead to dry, cracked skin. Even more, winter is on the way, bringing with it cold, dry weather that is notoriously hard on the skin. 

Fox News spoke to Dr. Latanya Benjamin, a Society for Pediatric Dermatology executive committee member, to learn why winter is so harsh on the skin and what you can do about it.

Read on for a look at what she had to say.

Hand washing is an expert-recommended way to stave off a COVID-19 infection, but it can lead to dry, cracked skin. Even more, winter is on the way, bringing with it cold, dry weather that is notoriously hard on the skin.

Hand washing is an expert-recommended way to stave off a COVID-19 infection, but it can lead to dry, cracked skin. Even more, winter is on the way, bringing with it cold, dry weather that is notoriously hard on the skin.
(iStock)

Fox News: Why is winter weather so harsh on the skin?

Benjamin: At this time of year and heading into the winter months, dry, cold

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Restaurants face high fees from delivery apps. Uber buying Postmates will make it worse.

Restaurants face high fees from delivery apps. Uber buying Postmates will make it worse.
Restaurants face high fees from delivery apps. Uber buying Postmates will make it worse.

Nobu Shiozawa is determined to get customers his restaurant’s homemade tofu and sushi without using delivery apps such as Uber Eats, Grubhub, DoorDash, and Postmates.

That’s not easy these days. Thanks to COVID-19, New York City banned restaurant dining in March. So Shiozawa, who owns and manages in New York City, uses his own small crew to avoid high commissions from the apps, usually .

“If I start using the food delivery service providers during the pandemic, the number of orders and the amount of sales would be increased,” he admitted.

But then he would have to hire more workers to handle the extra orders, which was hard for him to justify with the high fees and the fact he cut more than 60 percent of his staff after the pandemic started.

Image: Nobu Shiozawa

Image:

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