Scientists discover ‘fatigue’ protein that raises hope of blood test to diagnose depression

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Japanese scientists have identified a protein that thrives in the human brain on fatigue and stress and dramatically increases the likelihood of depression – a breakthrough that may lead to improved diagnosis and treatment.

It has long been understood that over-tiredness and stress are some of the root causes of depression, but researchers at Jikei University’s School of Medicine have determined that the protein is triggered by a virus. They also estimate that someone with the protein is more than 12 times more likely to develop mental health problems. 

The scientists’ findings were released in early June in the iScience online publication.

“The fact that over-fatigue leads to depression seemed to be self-evident, but it has never actually been verified until now”, said Professor Kazuhiro Kondo, a virologist and one of the lead scientists on the project. 

“We were able to uncover a part of the mechanism of how depression

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Video showing lack of social distancing at Universal Orlando sparks concern about theme parks reopening

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Visitors ride a roller coaster at Universal Studios theme park on the first day of reopening from the coronavirus pandemic, on June 5, 2020, in Orlando, Florida. (Photo by Gregg Newton / AFP) (Photo by GREGG NEWTON/AFP via Getty Images)
Visitors ride a roller coaster at Universal Studios theme park on the first day of reopening from the coronavirus pandemic, on June 5, 2020, in Orlando, Florida. (Photo by Gregg Newton / AFP) (Photo by GREGG NEWTON/AFP via Getty Images)

Universal Orlando reopened in early June and the theme park has already come under fire after suggestions that employees on one ride were not enforcing social distancing.

An account that shares news related to the theme park, called @UniNewsToday, wrote on Twitter over the weekend that “all of the social distancing markers near the load area at Hagrid’s [Magical Creatures Motorbike Adventure] are gone. There’s also a Team Member yelling ‘fill in all the available space.’”

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Is It Safe To Take An Uber, Lyft Or Taxi During Coronavirus?

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There are important factors to keep in mind and ways to mitigate the risks when it comes to taking a taxi or rideshare service during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo: martin-dm via Getty Images)
There are important factors to keep in mind and ways to mitigate the risks when it comes to taking a taxi or rideshare service during the COVID-19 pandemic. (Photo: martin-dm via Getty Images)

As more businesses reopen and people emerge from their homes with greater frequency, there’s a sense that things are getting back to “normal.” Many folks are easing into activities from their pre-pandemic lives, like dining at a restaurant, booking air travel and even taking an Uber.

But are rideshare services like Uber and Lyft ― or even traditional taxis ― safe for passengers amid the COVID-19 pandemic?

“Although it doesn’t feel as scary as it used to be, we are nowhere near the end of this pandemic,” said Kit Delgado, an assistant professor or emergency medicine and epidemiology at the University of Pennsylvania. “As of today we are still identifying more than 20,000 new cases of COVID-19

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Why Parents Shouldn’t Be Too Worried If Their Teen Can’t Put Their Phone Down Right Now

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Click here to read the full article.

You don’t have to be a social psychologist to notice that daily life has been altered pretty drastically for people of all ages bringing many of us even closer with our devices. But for tech-obsessed teenagers, whose non-tech activities — school days, sports, and social outings — have been largely taken away, the result has been even more screen time. (That’s on top of the seven hours a day teens tend to spend on screens, to begin with).

“This pandemic has definitely challenged normal adolescent development, which is centered on having experiences that develop your identity separate from your family’s and adolescent peer socialization,” says Hina J. Talib, M.D., program director of the post-doctoral fellowship in adolescent medicine at Children’s Hospital at Montefiore.

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And while today’s tech (think: Zoom, TikTok, Instagram, online classes) does provide social connection, if you’re

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Common problems and how to fix them

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There’s nothing better than pulling a PlayStation VR headset from its packaging, putting it on your head for the first time, and diving into the wonderful worlds that only virtual reality can deliver. Virtual reality is intense, surreal, and unlike anything we’ve seen in video games before.

At the same time, there’s nothing worse than plugging in your PSVR for the first time, only to discover that it isn’t working the way it’s supposed to. To help you iron out the kinks, we’ve compiled a list of some of the most common problems plaguing Sony’s newfangled headset, as well as the steps you can take to rectify them. Not all of these will affect every user — particularly those pertaining to motion sickness — and not every solution we put forth is guaranteed to fix your problem. For more serious issues, you’ll likely have to contact Sony directly.

Further reading:

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2020 MassChallenge Texas In Austin Details Released

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AUSTIN, TX — MassChallenge, a global network of zero-equity startup accelerators, has announced the 58 early-stage startups invited to join the 2020 MassChallenge Texas in Austin program.

The selected startups have been rigorously vetted by a community of more than 500 expert judges and represent the top 10 percent of applications from around the world, officials said in an advisory.

“Today’s entrepreneurs will have a fundamental impact on how efficiently the world recovers from the current economic crisis, and the game-changing startups in this year’s Austin-based cohort are poised to do just that,” Mike Millard, managing director of MassChallenge Texas, said. “I am incredibly impressed by the founders’ abilities to navigate their businesses through the coronavirus crisis, leveraging the intersection of business and technology to create solutions across agriculture, internet of things, medical devices, manufacturing, and more. These startups have a place helping large organizations recalibrate as they adapt to

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we answer 6 common face mask problems

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Face coverings are now mandatory on public transport in England, to slow the spread of coronavirus as things start to come back to normal. But wearing a face mask presents a couple of annoying problems: taking a sip of water on a hot train is tricky, as is keeping your make-up neat underneath. Read on below for some answers.

How to stop your glasses steaming up

Wearing a mask can cover more than your nose and mouth: water vapour from your breath can get funnelled upwards and cloud your glasses, making it difficult to see. 

Alisdair Buchanan, the owner of Buchanan Optometrists in Snodland, Kent, has a couple of tips to stop this happening. The first is to stop your glasses from coming into contact with moisture in the first place, by sealing the top of the mask to your face with micropore tape.

Placing your glasses on top of

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Black Americans most likely to know a COVID-19 victim

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DETROIT (AP) — African Americans are disproportionately likely to say a family member or close friend has died of COVID-19 or respiratory illness since March, according to a series of surveys conducted since April that lays bare how black Americans have borne the brunt of the pandemic.

Eleven percent of African Americans say they were close with someone who has died from the coronavirus, compared with 5% of Americans overall and 4% of white Americans.

The findings are based on data from three COVID Impact surveys conducted between April and June by NORC at the University of Chicago for the Data Foundation about the pandemic’s effect on the physical, mental and social health of Americans.

While recent surveys conducted by the AP-NORC Center for Public Affairs Research have found that black Americans are especially likely to know someone who had the virus, the new data from the COVID Impact research

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Banning bushmeat could make it harder to stop future pandemics

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Since the beginning of the coronavirus pandemic, eating the meat of wild animals has been getting a bad press.

Last month, more than 300 conservation groups signed an open letter asking the World Health Organization (WHO) to take measures to prevent new diseases emerging from wild animals. This included banning the sale of wild animal meat, also known as bushmeat. The request stemmed from evidence that SARS-CoV-2 likely originated in a wild animal, probably a species of bat, before jumping to an intermediate host, possibly a pangolin, and then infecting a human.

Although exactly where the first person picked up the virus is hotly contested, the media and researchers have focused on China’s wet markets, particularly those selling wild animals and their meat. At these markets, finding civet cats, turtles, bats and pangolins kept alive in small cages, often in close proximity, is not uncommon. In such conditions, wild animals

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What to Do if Your Medical School Is Online This Fall Due to Coronavirus

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The coronavirus pandemic is a public health crisis that highlights the importance of the medical profession. During a time such as this one, when a contagious disease has spread across the world and humanity is collectively searching for a vaccine or cure, future physicians may feel a sense of urgency and want to begin training immediately.

However, the fight against the coronavirus relies upon social distancing measures, posing a challenge to newly admitted medical students. The upcoming fall semester for first-year medical students might differ from what it would have been if the virus outbreak had not emerged, since some or all coursework may need to be completed virtually, according to medical education experts. For instance, this May, Harvard Medical School announced that its fall 2020 classes for first-year medical students would “commence remotely.”

[Read: What the Coronavirus Pandemic Means for Premed Students.]

Nevertheless, many experts say that so

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