Why My Kids Won’t Be Returning To School Yet

It’s consuming every mother—every parent—I know. This decision we’ve never had to make before, and never expected we’d be forced to make. Most of us aren’t teachers. We don’t want to homeschool. We work full or part time or have a sea of babies and toddlers under our feet and have no idea how we’ll manage this continuation of e-learning/at-home learning. And yet we can’t fathom sending our kids into the unpredictable COVID-19 petri dish that schools will inevitably be.

So we turn to experts for advice. What do does the medical community recommend we do? What are they doing with their own children? Maybe if we do enough research or read enough articles or talk to enough experts, our path will become clear and we’ll know what the right choice is. Or maybe we’ll still continue to fumble through this fog, not knowing what’s right, praying we’re making the

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Masks compulsory in England today but police won’t be needed to enforce rule, minister says

Police are not expected to be called in to enforce the compulsory wearing of face masks in shops in England from Friday, a minister has said. - OLI SCARFF/AFP
Police are not expected to be called in to enforce the compulsory wearing of face masks in shops in England from Friday, a minister has said. – OLI SCARFF/AFP

Police are not expected to be called in to enforce the compulsory wearing of face masks in shops in England from Friday, a minister has said. 

Health minister Helen Whately told the BBC: “There is the option of the police to get involved for enforcement and for there to be fines, but I really don’t think we will need to go down that line because most people will follow the rules and take this very seriously. 

“People don’t want to see the Covid-19 rate go up again. People know that by wearing a face mask it’s about protecting those around you – particularly the most vulnerable – and making sure we do not get increased rates of Covid-19 which could mean

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Santa Cruz Students Likely Won’t Return To School This Fall

SANTA CRUZ, CA — The Santa Cruz County Office of Education confirmed Monday that it does not anticipate students will return to in-person classes in the fall.

That’s because Santa Cruz County met the criteria for the state monitoring list, which indicates state public health officials are keeping an eye on concerning COVID-19 statistics, wrote Santa Cruz City Schools Superintendent Kris Munro and other county schools officials in an open letter Monday. Of particular concern was the fact that the COVID-19 case count has been higher than 100 cases per 100,000 people for more than three consecutive days.

While Santa Cruz County had not been added the state’s list as of Tuesday evening, county Health Officer Gail Newel previously said that she expected Santa Cruz County to join its neighboring counties on the monitoring list.

In order for a school district to open for in-class instruction, it must be in

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Watsonville Students Likely Won’t Return To School This Fall

WATSONVILLE, CA — The Santa Cruz County Office of Education confirmed Monday that it does not anticipate students will return to in-person classes in the fall.

That’s because Santa Cruz County met the criteria for the state monitoring list, which indicates state public health officials are keeping an eye on concerning COVID-19 statistics, wrote Pajaro Valley Unified School District Superintendent Michelle Rodriguez and other county schools officials in an open letter Monday. Of particular concern was the fact that the COVID-19 case count has been higher than 100 cases per 100,000 people for more than three consecutive days, school officials said.

While Santa Cruz County had not been added the state’s list as of Tuesday evening, county Health Officer Gail Newel previously said that she expected Santa Cruz County to join its neighboring counties on the monitoring list.

In order for a school district to open for in-class instruction, it

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High school football in California won’t begin until December or January due to COVID-19

High school football in the state of California will not begin until December at the earliest. 

The California Interscholastic Federation (CIF) announced Monday that the sports season for the upcoming school year will begin with a modified schedule, beginning in December 2020 or January 2021. The unprecedented alteration is due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic. 

The CIF, which is divided into 10 Sections throughout the state, said each individual Section will determine their own calendar “to reflect regular season starting and ending dates,” as well as playoffs. 

“It is anticipated that most Section start dates will commence in December 2020 or January 2021,” the CIF said in a statement.

Due to a recent surge in coronavirus cases, most California schools are planning to start the upcoming academic year by offering only online classes. According to the Los Angeles Times, high school football practices were scheduled to begin Aug. 3 with

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CIF announces high school sports season won’t begin until December or January

St. John Bosco's Jake Newman, left, and Josh Alford pursue Mater Dei receiver Kody Epps in Bellflower, Calif., on Oct. 25, 2019. The 2020 high school sports season will be delayed. <span class="copyright">(Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)</span>
St. John Bosco’s Jake Newman, left, and Josh Alford pursue Mater Dei receiver Kody Epps in Bellflower, Calif., on Oct. 25, 2019. The 2020 high school sports season will be delayed. (Allen J. Schaben / Los Angeles Times)

The start of the high school sports season in California will be delayed until December or January, the California Interscholastic Federation announced Monday.

In releasing a new sports calendar, the state’s governing body for high school sports might be giving the state’s more than 800,000 athletes their best opportunity to have a sports season in the 2020-21 school year. With a summer surge in coronavirus, most California public and private schools plan to begin the academic year with online classes.

“This is the best possible plan we have with what’s going on to give students an opportunity to participate,” said Vicky Lagos, the Los Angeles City Section commissioner. “There are going to

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We won’t immediately have a ‘perfect vaccine,’ and it is ‘not realistic’ to expect the virus will soon be eliminated

President Donald Trump wears a mask as he walks down the hallway during his visit to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Saturday, July 11, 2020.
President Donald Trump wears a mask as he walks down the hallway during his visit to Walter Reed National Military Medical Center in Bethesda, Md., Saturday, July 11, 2020.

Associated Press/Patrick Semansky

  • The World Health Organization warned Monday that any coronavirus vaccine will likely not be “perfect,” in part because not “everyone will have access” to it right away.

  • The WHO stressed that other time-tested public health measures: handwashing, social distancing, quarantining, and wearing masks in public, can all help tamp down the spread of the virus in the meantime.

  • “Turn and face the problem and accept that it’s going to take time,” the WHO’s Mike Ryan said. “It’s going to require a huge commitment on the part of government and individuals in a number of countries to turn this around.” 

  • Visit Business Insider’s homepage for more stories.

A coronavirus vaccine is still many months away, but leading infectious disease

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Carnival cruise lines plan ‘staggered’ comeback, won’t return to full capacity until 2022

Cruise giant Carnival plans a phased-in approach for its return to sailing, beginning with fewer ships and fewer passengers, on a region-by-region basis. The company will not make a full return in terms of passenger capacity until 2022 at the earliest, according to CEO Arnold Donald.

 “[The] nature of restart is going to be almost country by country and destination by destination,” Donald said on an earnings call Friday, four months after the company paused operations because of the coronavirus. 

Carnival’s restart will mimic international reopenings.

The resumption of shoreside social gathering practices will be the “critical thing” as an indicator for the resumption of cruising. Donald pointed to Germany, where Carnival subsidiary AIDA Cruises will resume sailing three of its ships in August after the country began to reopen in the spring.  Italy, he suggested, might be next. 

AIDA’s three scheduled cruises will not make port calls in Europe 

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Social distancing won’t stop until there’s a vaccine, B.C. health officials say

Yahoo News Canada is committed to providing our readers with the most accurate and recent information on all things coronavirus. We know things change quickly, including some possible information in this story. For the latest on COVID-19, we encourage our readers to consult online resources like Canada’s public health website, World Health Organization, as well as our own Yahoo Canada homepage.

As cases of COVID-19 continue to spread around the world, Canadians seem to be increasingly concerned about their health and safety

Currently, there are more than 106,000 confirmed coronavirus cases in Canada and more than 8,700 deaths.

Check back for the latest updates on the coronavirus outbreak in Canada.

For a full archive of the first month of the pandemic, please check our archive of events.

July 9

7:15 p.m.: COVID-19 polls of the day

7:00 p.m.: B.C.’s top doctor says some public health measures will

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ICE says students taking ‘hybrid’ classes may be able to stay in the US, but it won’t tell colleges what that means

Many universities including NYU, which is home to over 17,000 international students, plan to operate under a hybrid model in the fall.
Many universities including NYU, which is home to over 17,000 international students, plan to operate under a hybrid model in the fall.

Facebook/NYU

  • New guidelines from ICE prevent international students on certain visas from attending schools that are fully online, but may allow them to remain if they’re taking a mixture of online and in-person classes.

  • Many universities have announced they will use a “hybrid model,” combining both in-person and online courses for the upcoming academic year.

  • With “very little information” included in the announcement, however, the new policy lacks clarity in what may be required for a hybrid model, a Senior Legislative and Advocacy Counsel at ACLU told Business Insider.

  • A number of faculty have spoken out on social media that they will offer “1-unit in-person study with any student that faces removal from the country” due to the new policy. 

  • Visit Insider’s homepage for more stories.

Universities have

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